NYT promotes merits of boycotting white businesses

One of the best ways that minorities can become empowered, figures the NYT, is to exclusively patronize minority-owned businesses, which also means boycotting white ones:

Should black people go out of their way to patronize black-owned business?

Maggie Anderson says they should. For Ms. Anderson, buying black presented multiple challenges. She purchased gas from a black-owned Citgo gas station 35 miles away from her home in Oak Park, Ill. Because that was inconvenient, she eventually bought gas cards from a black-owned store and used them at a station near her home. Finding a black-owned grocery store, bank and other establishments was more challenging than she had expected.

I wonder how she did it.  Did she walk into every grocery store and say, "Excuse me, I am black and I am looking to shop in a black-owned store. Before I decide whether to shop here, can you tell me if the owners of this establishment have the same racial makeup as I do?"

A study by the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University found that between half a million and a million jobs could be created if higher-income black households spent only $1 of every $10 at black-owned stores and other enterprises.

What?  If that $1 is spent in any business, white or black, it is being spent.  There is no "multiplier effect" of spending money in black-owned business.  And this from the Kellogg School of Management?  I think they should stick to Corn Flakes.

Though statistics show that black incomes and higher education rates are rising, working hard and investing more in the black community will not be enough to level the playing field, according to Darrick Hamilton, an associate professor of economics and urban policy and director of the Milano Doctoral Program at The New School in New York.

It takes a professor at The New School to tell us that working hard and investing more won't work.

Ms. Anderson said she was developing Maggie’s List, an online guide to help consumers find black-owned businesses, which she hopes to have running in six to eight months.

It's an Angie's List...for black people!  But instead of rating businesses for how good they are, Maggie's List can rate them for how black they are.

You know, I think black people should not read the New York Times because it isn't owned by black people.  If they want news, they should stick to press releases from Ben Carson's website or listen to Allen West on talk radio.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

One of the best ways that minorities can become empowered, figures the NYT, is to exclusively patronize minority-owned businesses, which also means boycotting white ones:

Should black people go out of their way to patronize black-owned business?

Maggie Anderson says they should. For Ms. Anderson, buying black presented multiple challenges. She purchased gas from a black-owned Citgo gas station 35 miles away from her home in Oak Park, Ill. Because that was inconvenient, she eventually bought gas cards from a black-owned store and used them at a station near her home. Finding a black-owned grocery store, bank and other establishments was more challenging than she had expected.

I wonder how she did it.  Did she walk into every grocery store and say, "Excuse me, I am black and I am looking to shop in a black-owned store. Before I decide whether to shop here, can you tell me if the owners of this establishment have the same racial makeup as I do?"

A study by the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University found that between half a million and a million jobs could be created if higher-income black households spent only $1 of every $10 at black-owned stores and other enterprises.

What?  If that $1 is spent in any business, white or black, it is being spent.  There is no "multiplier effect" of spending money in black-owned business.  And this from the Kellogg School of Management?  I think they should stick to Corn Flakes.

Though statistics show that black incomes and higher education rates are rising, working hard and investing more in the black community will not be enough to level the playing field, according to Darrick Hamilton, an associate professor of economics and urban policy and director of the Milano Doctoral Program at The New School in New York.

It takes a professor at The New School to tell us that working hard and investing more won't work.

Ms. Anderson said she was developing Maggie’s List, an online guide to help consumers find black-owned businesses, which she hopes to have running in six to eight months.

It's an Angie's List...for black people!  But instead of rating businesses for how good they are, Maggie's List can rate them for how black they are.

You know, I think black people should not read the New York Times because it isn't owned by black people.  If they want news, they should stick to press releases from Ben Carson's website or listen to Allen West on talk radio.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.