Houston to vote on repeal of 'human rights' law that includes men being able to use women's bathrooms

Can you imagine if a Republican politician subpoenaed the sermons from black churches to see if they had political content? There would be such a firestorm that the politician would surely be forced to resign.

But if the politician is Annise Parker, the lesbian Democratic  Mayor of Houston, it's not such a problem. The story starts with the referendum next week to repeal a "human rights ordnance" which includes giving the ok for men to use women's bathrooms. The supporters of the measure say it has nothing to do with men going into womens' bathrooms, which means, of course, that what it's all about it.

Outside a polling station near this city’s wealthy River Oaks neighborhood, dozens of campaign signs plastered with the names of candidates line a busy section of West Gray Street. But a few stand out for their lack of names and their stark message in black and red letters: “No Men in Women’s Bathrooms.”

An election battle over the city’s equal rights ordinance has turned into an expensive and bitterly fought culture war.... Proponents said 200 other cities in 17 states had passed similar ordinances to give residents local tools, short of federal lawsuits, to fight discrimination. They worry that a defeat at the polls could generate enough controversy to jeopardize Houston’s status as the host city for the Super Bowl in 2017.

[Mayor Parker] said that if voters repealed the ordinance, Houston’s reputation on the national stage would be damaged.

If Houston does not allow men in womens' bathrooms, people may boycott Houston, and it's reputation would be damaged.

Opponents argue that the ordinance would allow men who identify as women to enter women’s bathrooms and attack women and young girls, and that business owners who tried to prevent this from happening would be fined.

One of their TV ads shows a man walking into a restroom, hiding in a stall and then startling a girl. The ad — paid for by the Campaign for Houston, an opposition coalition whose spokesman, Jared Woodfill, is a former chairman of the Harris County Republican Party — ends with the man entering the girl’s stall and shutting the door. “Any man at any time could enter a woman’s bathroom simply by claiming to be a woman that day,” the narrator says of what the ad calls the bathroom ordinance.

“It clearly allows biological males and even registered sex offenders to enter female showers, bathrooms or locker rooms,” [an opponent of the measure] said. “We’re not willing to compromise the safety of our wives, our mothers and our daughters on the altar of political correctness.”

The city didn't like church involvement against the measure, so they decided to investigate:

...city lawyers subpoenaed the sermons of five pastors, galvanizing Christian conservatives against Ms. Parker and the ordinance.

You see, not only is the far-left trying to change our culture, but they are attacking religion and freedom of expression. They will not even admit the purpose of their measure is to let men, including convicted rapists and molesters, use womens' bathrooms, even though that is exactly what the measure intends. When churches brought attention to this, they were the ones to be persecuted.

Mayor Parker should resign or be prosecuted for her conduct. Instead, she will probably get a medal. Meanwhile we have Obama's administration saying that womens' bathrooms are safer with men in them, and California, of all places, pushing a ballot initiative to keep men out of womens' bathrooms.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

 

 

Can you imagine if a Republican politician subpoenaed the sermons from black churches to see if they had political content? There would be such a firestorm that the politician would surely be forced to resign.

But if the politician is Annise Parker, the lesbian Democratic  Mayor of Houston, it's not such a problem. The story starts with the referendum next week to repeal a "human rights ordnance" which includes giving the ok for men to use women's bathrooms. The supporters of the measure say it has nothing to do with men going into womens' bathrooms, which means, of course, that what it's all about it.

Outside a polling station near this city’s wealthy River Oaks neighborhood, dozens of campaign signs plastered with the names of candidates line a busy section of West Gray Street. But a few stand out for their lack of names and their stark message in black and red letters: “No Men in Women’s Bathrooms.”

An election battle over the city’s equal rights ordinance has turned into an expensive and bitterly fought culture war.... Proponents said 200 other cities in 17 states had passed similar ordinances to give residents local tools, short of federal lawsuits, to fight discrimination. They worry that a defeat at the polls could generate enough controversy to jeopardize Houston’s status as the host city for the Super Bowl in 2017.

[Mayor Parker] said that if voters repealed the ordinance, Houston’s reputation on the national stage would be damaged.

If Houston does not allow men in womens' bathrooms, people may boycott Houston, and it's reputation would be damaged.

Opponents argue that the ordinance would allow men who identify as women to enter women’s bathrooms and attack women and young girls, and that business owners who tried to prevent this from happening would be fined.

One of their TV ads shows a man walking into a restroom, hiding in a stall and then startling a girl. The ad — paid for by the Campaign for Houston, an opposition coalition whose spokesman, Jared Woodfill, is a former chairman of the Harris County Republican Party — ends with the man entering the girl’s stall and shutting the door. “Any man at any time could enter a woman’s bathroom simply by claiming to be a woman that day,” the narrator says of what the ad calls the bathroom ordinance.

“It clearly allows biological males and even registered sex offenders to enter female showers, bathrooms or locker rooms,” [an opponent of the measure] said. “We’re not willing to compromise the safety of our wives, our mothers and our daughters on the altar of political correctness.”

The city didn't like church involvement against the measure, so they decided to investigate:

...city lawyers subpoenaed the sermons of five pastors, galvanizing Christian conservatives against Ms. Parker and the ordinance.

You see, not only is the far-left trying to change our culture, but they are attacking religion and freedom of expression. They will not even admit the purpose of their measure is to let men, including convicted rapists and molesters, use womens' bathrooms, even though that is exactly what the measure intends. When churches brought attention to this, they were the ones to be persecuted.

Mayor Parker should resign or be prosecuted for her conduct. Instead, she will probably get a medal. Meanwhile we have Obama's administration saying that womens' bathrooms are safer with men in them, and California, of all places, pushing a ballot initiative to keep men out of womens' bathrooms.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.