Dartmouth official apologizes to protesters for negative media coverage of library demonstration

Yesterday, I wrote about the Black Lives Matter demonstration at the Dartmouth library where protesters harrassed and threatened students.

The protest drew a response from the school's administrators - not criticism directed toward Black Lives Matter but rather an apology for all the negative media coverage:

Daily Caller:

The day after the protest, college president Phil Hanlon sent out a campus-wide email that affirmed the importance of treating people with “dignity and respect” but made no mention of the Thursday protest that obviously prompted it.

The school released a short statement Monday saying that no reports of violence had been made to the school, but that other complaints related to the protest were being investigated. Leigh Remy, head of Dartmouth’s judicial affairs office, told The Dartmouth that several “bias incident” reports had been made by students who claim to have felt intimidated by the protest.

But Remy said that several more complaints were coming from the protesters themselves, who claim to feel unsafe after being accused of violence on social media platforms like Yik Yak.

In fact, so far, the only people Dartmouth has seen fit to apologize to are the protesters themselves. During a Monday night community discussion at the school’s black affinity dormitory, vice provost for student affairs Inge-Lise Ameer apologized to protesters for the hostile coverage their protest received.

“There’s a whole conservative world out there that’s not being very nice,” Ameer said to the protesters.

Because every white person should be threatened and screamed at by crazy people at least once in their lives.

Note that the BLM spokesperson freely admits they were trying to intimidate people which directly contradicts school policy regarding "bias." But BLM doesn't have to abide by the rules when they look to make people feel their "discomfort."

My guess is that students would feel a lot less threatened if they didn't do things to threaten other people. But in the topsy-turvy, upside down La-La-Land that the protesters live in, the exercise of thuggery in pursuit of political power is not only justified, but encouraged.

Yesterday, I wrote about the Black Lives Matter demonstration at the Dartmouth library where protesters harrassed and threatened students.

The protest drew a response from the school's administrators - not criticism directed toward Black Lives Matter but rather an apology for all the negative media coverage:

Daily Caller:

The day after the protest, college president Phil Hanlon sent out a campus-wide email that affirmed the importance of treating people with “dignity and respect” but made no mention of the Thursday protest that obviously prompted it.

The school released a short statement Monday saying that no reports of violence had been made to the school, but that other complaints related to the protest were being investigated. Leigh Remy, head of Dartmouth’s judicial affairs office, told The Dartmouth that several “bias incident” reports had been made by students who claim to have felt intimidated by the protest.

But Remy said that several more complaints were coming from the protesters themselves, who claim to feel unsafe after being accused of violence on social media platforms like Yik Yak.

In fact, so far, the only people Dartmouth has seen fit to apologize to are the protesters themselves. During a Monday night community discussion at the school’s black affinity dormitory, vice provost for student affairs Inge-Lise Ameer apologized to protesters for the hostile coverage their protest received.

“There’s a whole conservative world out there that’s not being very nice,” Ameer said to the protesters.

Because every white person should be threatened and screamed at by crazy people at least once in their lives.

Note that the BLM spokesperson freely admits they were trying to intimidate people which directly contradicts school policy regarding "bias." But BLM doesn't have to abide by the rules when they look to make people feel their "discomfort."

My guess is that students would feel a lot less threatened if they didn't do things to threaten other people. But in the topsy-turvy, upside down La-La-Land that the protesters live in, the exercise of thuggery in pursuit of political power is not only justified, but encouraged.