Rep. Ryan agrees to delay discussion on changing 'motion to vacate' rule

One of Rep. Paul Ryan's "conditions" for accepting the speakership of the House was to get rid of the "motion to vacate" the speaker's chair rule that eventually doomed John Boehner. He didn't think it was appropriate to have this sword of Damocles constantly hovering over his head.

This was a sticking poiint with House conservatives on the Freedom Caucus who see the value of holding such leverage over the speaker.

Yesterday, Ryan cleared the way for support from the Freedom Caucus by agreeing to make the "motion to vacate" part of a larger discussion of party and House rules reforms that conservatives are demanding.

Politico:

Rep. Paul Ryan has agreed to delay a discussion about reforming the procedural motion used to remove a House speaker, a major concession to the House Freedom Caucus.

The Wisconsin Republican, now the presumptive next speaker of the House, delivered the message to Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, the chairman of the Freedom Caucus, according to multiple sources familiar with the discussion. Possible changes to the so-called "motion to vacate" will now come as part of a larger discussion of reworking internal party and House rules. Should he become House speaker, Ryan will set a deadline by which the House Republican Conference will change chamber and party rules.

In launching his bid for speaker, Ryan said the next speaker could not operate under the constant threat of a referendum vote to remove him from his position. He has not said how he wants to reform the motion to vacate, but several options have been discussed, including increasing the threshold to bring such a motion to a vote. Ryan is still insisting on changes to the legislative maneuver to remove the speaker, and the House Freedom Caucus is open to changing the procedure, several members have said.

The Freedom Caucus stopped short of endorsing Ryan's bid for speaker, but a supermajority of the group is supporting him.

This uneasy alliance is not likely to last. Ryan doesn't want to be a prisoner of the right while conservatives don't want Ryan straying far from the reservation. The whole thing could blow up in the next couple of weeks as the GOP leadership is looking to pass a "clean" debt limit bill in early November with no conditions. Or the relationship may implode a month later when the funding debate comes to a head in December.

The fact is, the GOP establishment is not on the same page as House conservatives. In fact, they're not even reading from the same book. It's hard to see how the mild mannered Ryan can knock heads to unify his fractious caucus. Appeals to party loyalty has little effect on conservatives, which means it's probable that Ryan will regret his decision to become speaker sooner rather than later.


 

 

One of Rep. Paul Ryan's "conditions" for accepting the speakership of the House was to get rid of the "motion to vacate" the speaker's chair rule that eventually doomed John Boehner. He didn't think it was appropriate to have this sword of Damocles constantly hovering over his head.

This was a sticking poiint with House conservatives on the Freedom Caucus who see the value of holding such leverage over the speaker.

Yesterday, Ryan cleared the way for support from the Freedom Caucus by agreeing to make the "motion to vacate" part of a larger discussion of party and House rules reforms that conservatives are demanding.

Politico:

Rep. Paul Ryan has agreed to delay a discussion about reforming the procedural motion used to remove a House speaker, a major concession to the House Freedom Caucus.

The Wisconsin Republican, now the presumptive next speaker of the House, delivered the message to Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, the chairman of the Freedom Caucus, according to multiple sources familiar with the discussion. Possible changes to the so-called "motion to vacate" will now come as part of a larger discussion of reworking internal party and House rules. Should he become House speaker, Ryan will set a deadline by which the House Republican Conference will change chamber and party rules.

In launching his bid for speaker, Ryan said the next speaker could not operate under the constant threat of a referendum vote to remove him from his position. He has not said how he wants to reform the motion to vacate, but several options have been discussed, including increasing the threshold to bring such a motion to a vote. Ryan is still insisting on changes to the legislative maneuver to remove the speaker, and the House Freedom Caucus is open to changing the procedure, several members have said.

The Freedom Caucus stopped short of endorsing Ryan's bid for speaker, but a supermajority of the group is supporting him.

This uneasy alliance is not likely to last. Ryan doesn't want to be a prisoner of the right while conservatives don't want Ryan straying far from the reservation. The whole thing could blow up in the next couple of weeks as the GOP leadership is looking to pass a "clean" debt limit bill in early November with no conditions. Or the relationship may implode a month later when the funding debate comes to a head in December.

The fact is, the GOP establishment is not on the same page as House conservatives. In fact, they're not even reading from the same book. It's hard to see how the mild mannered Ryan can knock heads to unify his fractious caucus. Appeals to party loyalty has little effect on conservatives, which means it's probable that Ryan will regret his decision to become speaker sooner rather than later.