Obama's paranoid view of those with strong religious beliefs

We've known since before he was president that Barack Obama is a bigot.  His comment about devout Christians that "they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them" revealed a man with profound antipathy toward people of faith.

In a conversation with author Marilynne Robinson, President Obama gave an even more exaggerated and paranoid statement on Christians.

The Hill:

In the unusual discussion, Obama revealed some of his longstanding frustrations with politics while asking the Iowa author questions about her family, her Christian faith and her writings.

“How do you reconcile the idea of faith being really important to you and you caring a lot about taking faith seriously with the fact that, at least in our democracy and our civic discourse, it seems as if folks who take religion the most seriously sometimes are also those who are suspicious of those not like them?” Obama asked during the interview, which was published Monday in the New York Review of Books.

Robinson replied that those “turning in on themselves — and God knows, arming themselves” against an “imagined other,” are not “taking their Christianity seriously.”

Obama’s comments about religion’s role in America have often irked his opponents. Throughout his presidency, a vocal group of Obama critics have questioned his Christian faith. 

Ahead of Pope Francis’s recent visit to the White House, Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that Obama “pretends to be” a Christian while blocking others from practicing their faith. 

Obama said that America’s greatness stems from a sense of “nagging dissatisfaction” that spurred settlers to move West, helped astronauts land on the moon and inspired the creation of the Internet. 

But he said Americans often take those achievements for granted, a mindset that fuels deep skepticism of government. 

“Whenever I hear people saying that our problems would be solved without government, I always want to tell them you need to go to some other countries where there really is no government, where the roads are never repaired ... or kids don’t have access to basic primary education,” he said. “That’s the logical conclusion if, in fact, you think that government is the enemy.”

The president's ignorance is matched by his arrogance.  He has no clue about people of strong faith because he doesn't believe in much of anything himself.  He can't fathom that his policies are being opposed not because people are racist or bigots, but because the policies are wrongheaded and dangerous.  His limited view of the opposition causes him to hugely exaggerate their faults and lump his opponents in with the worst in American politics.

Very few conservatives are calling for no government – at least, like the situation present in a country like Somalia, where warlords rule.  But that's not what the president believes.  He thinks the belief in no government is widespread, and he is courageously defending the role of government from the Visigoths and barbarians who would bring it down.

This is a profoundly disturbing interview that should be read in its entirety.

We've known since before he was president that Barack Obama is a bigot.  His comment about devout Christians that "they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them" revealed a man with profound antipathy toward people of faith.

In a conversation with author Marilynne Robinson, President Obama gave an even more exaggerated and paranoid statement on Christians.

The Hill:

In the unusual discussion, Obama revealed some of his longstanding frustrations with politics while asking the Iowa author questions about her family, her Christian faith and her writings.

“How do you reconcile the idea of faith being really important to you and you caring a lot about taking faith seriously with the fact that, at least in our democracy and our civic discourse, it seems as if folks who take religion the most seriously sometimes are also those who are suspicious of those not like them?” Obama asked during the interview, which was published Monday in the New York Review of Books.

Robinson replied that those “turning in on themselves — and God knows, arming themselves” against an “imagined other,” are not “taking their Christianity seriously.”

Obama’s comments about religion’s role in America have often irked his opponents. Throughout his presidency, a vocal group of Obama critics have questioned his Christian faith. 

Ahead of Pope Francis’s recent visit to the White House, Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that Obama “pretends to be” a Christian while blocking others from practicing their faith. 

Obama said that America’s greatness stems from a sense of “nagging dissatisfaction” that spurred settlers to move West, helped astronauts land on the moon and inspired the creation of the Internet. 

But he said Americans often take those achievements for granted, a mindset that fuels deep skepticism of government. 

“Whenever I hear people saying that our problems would be solved without government, I always want to tell them you need to go to some other countries where there really is no government, where the roads are never repaired ... or kids don’t have access to basic primary education,” he said. “That’s the logical conclusion if, in fact, you think that government is the enemy.”

The president's ignorance is matched by his arrogance.  He has no clue about people of strong faith because he doesn't believe in much of anything himself.  He can't fathom that his policies are being opposed not because people are racist or bigots, but because the policies are wrongheaded and dangerous.  His limited view of the opposition causes him to hugely exaggerate their faults and lump his opponents in with the worst in American politics.

Very few conservatives are calling for no government – at least, like the situation present in a country like Somalia, where warlords rule.  But that's not what the president believes.  He thinks the belief in no government is widespread, and he is courageously defending the role of government from the Visigoths and barbarians who would bring it down.

This is a profoundly disturbing interview that should be read in its entirety.