Germany's 'wilkommen' to Muslims will include publishing Mein Kampf

Just as hundreds of thousands of Muslims are arriving in Germany at the invitation of Chancellor Merkel, the publication of Mein Kampf will resume after decades of suppression.  And it will be Merkel’s government that is paying for the publishing.  William Bigelow of Breitbart reports:

Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler’s malevolent and malignant anti-Semitic manifesto, will be sold in German bookstores starting in January. The Munich-based Institute of Contemporary History (IFZ), funded by the German government, has edited an annotated version of the book, and will publish it after the copyright held by the German state of Bavaria expires in January 2016.

Needless to say, the remaining few Jews in Germany are not pleased:

Levi Salomon, spokesman for the Berlin-based Jewish Forum for Democracy and Against Anti-Semitism, said, “I am absolutely against the publication of ‘Mein Kampf,’ even with annotations. Can you annotate the Devil? Can you annotate a person like Hitler?”

Of course, Mein Kampf has been a perennial bestseller in Arabic, and it is doubtful many of the “refugees” will need to resort to the annotated German language-edition on offer from the federal government of Germany.  Still, the resumption of publication in Germany is not a welcome symbol of what lies ahead as the country changes.

Is everything old new again?

Just as hundreds of thousands of Muslims are arriving in Germany at the invitation of Chancellor Merkel, the publication of Mein Kampf will resume after decades of suppression.  And it will be Merkel’s government that is paying for the publishing.  William Bigelow of Breitbart reports:

Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler’s malevolent and malignant anti-Semitic manifesto, will be sold in German bookstores starting in January. The Munich-based Institute of Contemporary History (IFZ), funded by the German government, has edited an annotated version of the book, and will publish it after the copyright held by the German state of Bavaria expires in January 2016.

Needless to say, the remaining few Jews in Germany are not pleased:

Levi Salomon, spokesman for the Berlin-based Jewish Forum for Democracy and Against Anti-Semitism, said, “I am absolutely against the publication of ‘Mein Kampf,’ even with annotations. Can you annotate the Devil? Can you annotate a person like Hitler?”

Of course, Mein Kampf has been a perennial bestseller in Arabic, and it is doubtful many of the “refugees” will need to resort to the annotated German language-edition on offer from the federal government of Germany.  Still, the resumption of publication in Germany is not a welcome symbol of what lies ahead as the country changes.

Is everything old new again?