While working at State Department, Huma Abedin paid by private company to plan gala event featuring Bill Clinton

More details are emerging about Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin's separate "arrangement" with Teneo Holdings, where she worked as a consultant at the same time she was employed on a part-time basis with the State Department.

Just nine days after the attack on our embassy in Benghazi, Abedin put together a gala event for Teneo that featured Tony Blair, Bill Clinton, and former President George W. Bush.  The significance of this revelation is that it is the first concrete evidence of the kinds of work Abedin was doing for Teneo as a consultant.  At the same time, she was also a consultant for the Clinton Foundation and was paid more than $125,000 by the U.S. govenrment in her capacity as a "part-time" employee at State.

Washington Times:

It was one of the specific projects she worked on with Teneo during a seven-month period in which she earned a $15,000-a-month consulting fee from the firm while simultaneously receiving pay as a “special government employee” advising Mrs. Clinton at the State Department, according to interviews and documents.

Ms. Abedin, the wife of former Rep. Anthony D. Weiner of New York, worked as a full-time government employee and deputy chief of staff to Secretary of State Clinton from 2009 through mid-2012. She then moved to New York and transitioned to a part-time employee at State after giving birth to her first child and seeing her husband resign his congressional seat because of a sexting scandal.

The special government employee status at the State Department allowed Ms. Abedin to simultaneously take on other consulting work, as with Teneo and the Clinton Foundation, where she assessed the charity’s ongoing programs to pave the way for Mrs. Clinton’s return there after she left the State Department in early 2013.

In all, Ms. Abedin was paid about $105,000 over seven months to advise Teneo in New York from summer 2012 to early 2013, according to a person familiar with the arrangement. During the same time, she collected $126,239.80 in pay as a special government employee at the State Department, according to internal department records identifying her pay and leave that were obtained by The Times.

The specific nature of Ms. Abedin’s duties at Teneo has been shrouded in mystery and has become the subject of State Department and congressional inquiries looking into whether the work arrangements were proper or created any conflicts of interest.

I daresay there were few, if any, top-level government employees who were pulling down six figures as a consultant for a private company with very close ties to a foundation run by the family of a secretary of state, while double-dipping salary from a government job.  The entire arrangment reeks of cronyism and favoritism, as well as special treatment not afforded other government workers.

Clinton denied signing off on the special arrangement – until a document emerged showing she did.  Of course, the attorney general has very little interest in determining whether any laws were broken and probably won't prosecute even if there are.  Congress is trying to sort it all out, but the arrangement is so tangled that they will be months unraveling it.

More details are emerging about Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin's separate "arrangement" with Teneo Holdings, where she worked as a consultant at the same time she was employed on a part-time basis with the State Department.

Just nine days after the attack on our embassy in Benghazi, Abedin put together a gala event for Teneo that featured Tony Blair, Bill Clinton, and former President George W. Bush.  The significance of this revelation is that it is the first concrete evidence of the kinds of work Abedin was doing for Teneo as a consultant.  At the same time, she was also a consultant for the Clinton Foundation and was paid more than $125,000 by the U.S. govenrment in her capacity as a "part-time" employee at State.

Washington Times:

It was one of the specific projects she worked on with Teneo during a seven-month period in which she earned a $15,000-a-month consulting fee from the firm while simultaneously receiving pay as a “special government employee” advising Mrs. Clinton at the State Department, according to interviews and documents.

Ms. Abedin, the wife of former Rep. Anthony D. Weiner of New York, worked as a full-time government employee and deputy chief of staff to Secretary of State Clinton from 2009 through mid-2012. She then moved to New York and transitioned to a part-time employee at State after giving birth to her first child and seeing her husband resign his congressional seat because of a sexting scandal.

The special government employee status at the State Department allowed Ms. Abedin to simultaneously take on other consulting work, as with Teneo and the Clinton Foundation, where she assessed the charity’s ongoing programs to pave the way for Mrs. Clinton’s return there after she left the State Department in early 2013.

In all, Ms. Abedin was paid about $105,000 over seven months to advise Teneo in New York from summer 2012 to early 2013, according to a person familiar with the arrangement. During the same time, she collected $126,239.80 in pay as a special government employee at the State Department, according to internal department records identifying her pay and leave that were obtained by The Times.

The specific nature of Ms. Abedin’s duties at Teneo has been shrouded in mystery and has become the subject of State Department and congressional inquiries looking into whether the work arrangements were proper or created any conflicts of interest.

I daresay there were few, if any, top-level government employees who were pulling down six figures as a consultant for a private company with very close ties to a foundation run by the family of a secretary of state, while double-dipping salary from a government job.  The entire arrangment reeks of cronyism and favoritism, as well as special treatment not afforded other government workers.

Clinton denied signing off on the special arrangement – until a document emerged showing she did.  Of course, the attorney general has very little interest in determining whether any laws were broken and probably won't prosecute even if there are.  Congress is trying to sort it all out, but the arrangement is so tangled that they will be months unraveling it.