Hillary apologizes (sort of)

Using the vacant, flat tone of voice of a hostage captured by the North Koreans forced to apologize for American imperialism and crimes against the Korean people, Hillary Clinton finally apologized for her email Tuesday, in an interview with David Muir of ABC News (full transcript here). If you think I am kidding about the tone of voice, listen to this loop:

 

It is an odd setting for a hostage: a room with sweeping views of New York’s Central Park, obviously a luxurious captivity. The more complete apology exchange is:

DAVID MUIR: Here we sit, five months into your campaign and there are some eye-opening poll numbers out there, and I'm sure you're aware of them, when it comes to how Americans see you. Our ABC poll, Gallup, Quinnipiac showing your favorability numbers taking a sharp dive.

In one poll, the lowest ever. And when voters were asked, "What is the first word that comes to mind when you think of Hillary Clinton?" Words like liar, dishonest, untrustworthy were at the top of the list. Does this tell you that your original explanation about the private server, that you did it to carry one phone out of convenience, that this didn't sit well with the American people?

HILLARY CLINTON: Well, David, obviously, I don't like hearing that. I am confident by the end of this campaign people will know they can trust me. And that I will be on their side and will fight for them and their families. But I do think I could have and should have done a better job answering questions earlier.

I really didn't perhaps appreciate the need to do that. What I had done was allowed, it was above board. But in retrospect, certainly, as I look back at it now, even though it was allowed, I should've used two accounts. One for personal, one for work-related emails.

That was a mistake. I'm sorry about that. I take responsibility. And I'm trying to be as transparent as I possibly can to not only release 55,000 pages of my emails, turn over my server. But I am looking forward, finally, to testifying before Congress. Something I've been asking for nearly a year.

The “allowed” line she is pushing (see below) is an outright lie. A few months into her tenure as secretary of state, the Obama administration issued rules that require all business to be recorded on official government email, a regulation she flouted.

The vacant-toned apology came repeatedly declining to apologize for anything other than people being upset, and after maintaining for months that it is only the media, not the voters who are upset about her flouting of the law requiring the guarding of national security.  Just the day before this apology, she told the Associated Press:

Q: Why haven't you directly apologized for setting up and using a private email server as secretary of state?

A: "Well, I understand why people have questions and I'm trying to answer as many of those in as many different settings as I can. What I did was allowed by the State Department. It was fully above board. Everybody in the government with whom I emailed knew that I was using a personal email, and I have said it would have been a better choice to have had two separate email accounts. And I've also tried to not only take responsibility, because it was my decision, but to be as transparent as possible."

Hillary is still living in a delusional world in which she gets to proclaim lies and have them accepted as fact. This worked well for her husband, but no longer works for her. The realization is growing among Democrats that she will be an awful candidate, easy for the GOP to defeat. That is a crime worse than treason in their book.  Hillary’s troubles haven’t gotten any closer to resolution with her obviously insincere forced apology. And now, she is no doubt angry that she was forced, which will make her subsequent appearances all the more grudging and wooden.

Using the vacant, flat tone of voice of a hostage captured by the North Koreans forced to apologize for American imperialism and crimes against the Korean people, Hillary Clinton finally apologized for her email Tuesday, in an interview with David Muir of ABC News (full transcript here). If you think I am kidding about the tone of voice, listen to this loop:

 

It is an odd setting for a hostage: a room with sweeping views of New York’s Central Park, obviously a luxurious captivity. The more complete apology exchange is:

DAVID MUIR: Here we sit, five months into your campaign and there are some eye-opening poll numbers out there, and I'm sure you're aware of them, when it comes to how Americans see you. Our ABC poll, Gallup, Quinnipiac showing your favorability numbers taking a sharp dive.

In one poll, the lowest ever. And when voters were asked, "What is the first word that comes to mind when you think of Hillary Clinton?" Words like liar, dishonest, untrustworthy were at the top of the list. Does this tell you that your original explanation about the private server, that you did it to carry one phone out of convenience, that this didn't sit well with the American people?

HILLARY CLINTON: Well, David, obviously, I don't like hearing that. I am confident by the end of this campaign people will know they can trust me. And that I will be on their side and will fight for them and their families. But I do think I could have and should have done a better job answering questions earlier.

I really didn't perhaps appreciate the need to do that. What I had done was allowed, it was above board. But in retrospect, certainly, as I look back at it now, even though it was allowed, I should've used two accounts. One for personal, one for work-related emails.

That was a mistake. I'm sorry about that. I take responsibility. And I'm trying to be as transparent as I possibly can to not only release 55,000 pages of my emails, turn over my server. But I am looking forward, finally, to testifying before Congress. Something I've been asking for nearly a year.

The “allowed” line she is pushing (see below) is an outright lie. A few months into her tenure as secretary of state, the Obama administration issued rules that require all business to be recorded on official government email, a regulation she flouted.

The vacant-toned apology came repeatedly declining to apologize for anything other than people being upset, and after maintaining for months that it is only the media, not the voters who are upset about her flouting of the law requiring the guarding of national security.  Just the day before this apology, she told the Associated Press:

Q: Why haven't you directly apologized for setting up and using a private email server as secretary of state?

A: "Well, I understand why people have questions and I'm trying to answer as many of those in as many different settings as I can. What I did was allowed by the State Department. It was fully above board. Everybody in the government with whom I emailed knew that I was using a personal email, and I have said it would have been a better choice to have had two separate email accounts. And I've also tried to not only take responsibility, because it was my decision, but to be as transparent as possible."

Hillary is still living in a delusional world in which she gets to proclaim lies and have them accepted as fact. This worked well for her husband, but no longer works for her. The realization is growing among Democrats that she will be an awful candidate, easy for the GOP to defeat. That is a crime worse than treason in their book.  Hillary’s troubles haven’t gotten any closer to resolution with her obviously insincere forced apology. And now, she is no doubt angry that she was forced, which will make her subsequent appearances all the more grudging and wooden.