Call your doctor and ask about 'side effects' from the Iran deal

David Zucker, the wicked genius behind the "Airplane!" and "Naked Gun" film franchises experienced a starling revelation while watching the administration trying to sell the Iran nuclear deal. It hit him that the sales pitch was very similar to a prescription drug ad.

Washington Free Beacon:

“Every prescription drug ad follows the same basic pattern—5 seconds of how amazing and wonderful the drug would be, and then 25 seconds of all the miserable side effects,” Zucker said in an interview with the Washington Free Beacon.

Born out of the realization that the Iran deal similarly does little good and has countless lasting side-effects was Zucker’s latest ad, which mirrors most closely the commercials for erectile dysfunction pill Cialis and portrays President Barack Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Hillary Clinton negotiating with Iran’s “death to America”-shouting Mullahs.

Thus was born this uproariously funny video that mirrors drug ads in tone and content:

The soothing music and calm voice, hallmarks of any drug commercial, are indicative of the message from the administration that there is no need to panic over news that Iran will get $150 billion in sanctions relief and that U.S. inspectors won’t be able to access Iranian nuclear sites.

“We had the announcer read the ad in a very soothing fashion, just like in the ads,” said Zucker. “The salesmen of this Iran deal, just like prescription drugs, want to make sure that nobody is panicking. But I am panicking.”

Zucker compared Obama to Leslie Nielsen’s Frank Drebin character in Naked Gun, who famously waved his hands telling onlookers that there was “nothing to see here” even as explosives burst into the sky behind him.

The president's obsequiousness toward the Iranians, Kerry fumbling and bumbling, Hillary's apparent eagerness to please - good satire captures a germ of truth and exaggerates it to painful dimensions. And satire doesn't get any better than this.

David Zucker, the wicked genius behind the "Airplane!" and "Naked Gun" film franchises experienced a starling revelation while watching the administration trying to sell the Iran nuclear deal. It hit him that the sales pitch was very similar to a prescription drug ad.

Washington Free Beacon:

“Every prescription drug ad follows the same basic pattern—5 seconds of how amazing and wonderful the drug would be, and then 25 seconds of all the miserable side effects,” Zucker said in an interview with the Washington Free Beacon.

Born out of the realization that the Iran deal similarly does little good and has countless lasting side-effects was Zucker’s latest ad, which mirrors most closely the commercials for erectile dysfunction pill Cialis and portrays President Barack Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Hillary Clinton negotiating with Iran’s “death to America”-shouting Mullahs.

Thus was born this uproariously funny video that mirrors drug ads in tone and content:

The soothing music and calm voice, hallmarks of any drug commercial, are indicative of the message from the administration that there is no need to panic over news that Iran will get $150 billion in sanctions relief and that U.S. inspectors won’t be able to access Iranian nuclear sites.

“We had the announcer read the ad in a very soothing fashion, just like in the ads,” said Zucker. “The salesmen of this Iran deal, just like prescription drugs, want to make sure that nobody is panicking. But I am panicking.”

Zucker compared Obama to Leslie Nielsen’s Frank Drebin character in Naked Gun, who famously waved his hands telling onlookers that there was “nothing to see here” even as explosives burst into the sky behind him.

The president's obsequiousness toward the Iranians, Kerry fumbling and bumbling, Hillary's apparent eagerness to please - good satire captures a germ of truth and exaggerates it to painful dimensions. And satire doesn't get any better than this.