Anger at congressman who told second-grade class about Palestinian child suicide bombers

Arizona Congressman Matt Salmon is in hot water with parents over a civics lesson he gave to second- and third-graders last week. 

The parents are objecting to the congressman's presentation where he mentioned Palestinian child suicide bombers and nuclear weapons.

CBS5:

Several parents are demanding answers from Congressman Matt Salmon, saying they cannot believe what the lawmaker said to young school children during a visit to a Gilbert school.

"It should have probably just been a good civics lesson for kids who initially were excited to meet their congressman," parent Scott Campbell said.

That excitement, however, turned into fear.

That fear, according to Campbell, was spawned by something Salmon said during a presentation he made Thursday about how bills become laws. The audience? Second- and third-graders at San Tan Charter School.

Campbell said the lesson took a dark turn when it came time to talk about vetoes.

"The congressman chose to give an example of the current situation in Iran, and made some inappropriate comments about 'Do you know what a nuclear weapon is? Do you know that there are schools that train children your age to be suicide bombers?'" Campbell said. 

He and other parents were shocked. He said he had to console his young daughter.

"After school my daughter was very concerned and said to me she actually didn't even know what suicide was and was very afraid," he explained.

While Campbell was not able to get an explanation from Salmon, the congressman's office said Salmon planned to meet with concerned parents Monday.

"But just from my observation, it was a terrible lack of judgement in that particular case," Campbell said. "I was shocked initially. When I was hearing it, I was shocked and saddened."

I can state with absolute certainty that I knew what a nuclear bomb was and its capabilities by the time I was in third grade.  The only reason children today are upset is because they are being deliberately sheltered from the real world by well-meaning but ignorant parents.  Yes, nuclear weapons are scary, but so is growing up in ignorance.  I think it ridiculous that children who reach that age remain in ignorance of nuclear weapons.

As for the congressman mentioning child suicide bombers being trained in special schools, unless he gave some context to the statement, he probably should have kept his mouth shut.

I'm sure these parents would be amazed at the information amassed by kids who spend six hours a day in front of the TV or computer monitor.  They are a lot better informed than parents believe.  And part of the children's fear may reflect their belief that they are expected to be emotionally upset by this information.  Kids are geniuses at picking up clues from adults that get them love, acceptance, and attention.

We coddle our children to the point of madness.  It's no wonder they grow up terrified of a world they've been sheltered from.

Arizona Congressman Matt Salmon is in hot water with parents over a civics lesson he gave to second- and third-graders last week. 

The parents are objecting to the congressman's presentation where he mentioned Palestinian child suicide bombers and nuclear weapons.

CBS5:

Several parents are demanding answers from Congressman Matt Salmon, saying they cannot believe what the lawmaker said to young school children during a visit to a Gilbert school.

"It should have probably just been a good civics lesson for kids who initially were excited to meet their congressman," parent Scott Campbell said.

That excitement, however, turned into fear.

That fear, according to Campbell, was spawned by something Salmon said during a presentation he made Thursday about how bills become laws. The audience? Second- and third-graders at San Tan Charter School.

Campbell said the lesson took a dark turn when it came time to talk about vetoes.

"The congressman chose to give an example of the current situation in Iran, and made some inappropriate comments about 'Do you know what a nuclear weapon is? Do you know that there are schools that train children your age to be suicide bombers?'" Campbell said. 

He and other parents were shocked. He said he had to console his young daughter.

"After school my daughter was very concerned and said to me she actually didn't even know what suicide was and was very afraid," he explained.

While Campbell was not able to get an explanation from Salmon, the congressman's office said Salmon planned to meet with concerned parents Monday.

"But just from my observation, it was a terrible lack of judgement in that particular case," Campbell said. "I was shocked initially. When I was hearing it, I was shocked and saddened."

I can state with absolute certainty that I knew what a nuclear bomb was and its capabilities by the time I was in third grade.  The only reason children today are upset is because they are being deliberately sheltered from the real world by well-meaning but ignorant parents.  Yes, nuclear weapons are scary, but so is growing up in ignorance.  I think it ridiculous that children who reach that age remain in ignorance of nuclear weapons.

As for the congressman mentioning child suicide bombers being trained in special schools, unless he gave some context to the statement, he probably should have kept his mouth shut.

I'm sure these parents would be amazed at the information amassed by kids who spend six hours a day in front of the TV or computer monitor.  They are a lot better informed than parents believe.  And part of the children's fear may reflect their belief that they are expected to be emotionally upset by this information.  Kids are geniuses at picking up clues from adults that get them love, acceptance, and attention.

We coddle our children to the point of madness.  It's no wonder they grow up terrified of a world they've been sheltered from.