Trump disinvited as keynote speaker at RedState confab

Donald Trump was scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the conservative RedState political conference in Atlanta tonoght.

But citing his comments about Fox News debate moderator Megyn Kelly, RedState chief Erick Erickson has disinvited him.  In Trump's place, Erickson invited the target of Trump's bullying – Megyn Kelly.

Reuters:

"While I have tried to give him great latitude, his remark about Megyn Kelly was a bridge too far," Erickson said, adding he had invited Kelly, one of Fox's highest profile anchors, to attend his conference in Trump's place.

Trump was unbowed by the dumping.

"This is just another example of weakness through being politically correct," his campaign said in a statement.

"For all of the people who were looking forward to Mr. Trump coming, we will miss you. Blame Erick Erickson, your weak and pathetic leader. We'll now be doing another campaign stop at another location."

During the debate, Kelly asked Trump to respond to derogatory statements he had made in the past about women, calling them "fat pigs" for example. Trump tried to wave off the question and dismissed Kelly during a raucous debate performance.

"And honestly Megyn, if you don't like it, I'm sorry," Trump said. "I've been very nice to you, although I could probably maybe not be, based on the way you have treated me. But I wouldn't do that."

Erickson said in a Facebook statement that in a CNN interview Trump said of Kelly: "You could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her wherever."

"His comment was inappropriate," said Erickson.

"It is unfortunate to have to disinvite him. But I just don't want someone on stage who gets a hostile question from a lady and his first inclination is to imply it was hormonal. It just was wrong," he said.

"He is not a professional politician and is known for being a blunt talker. But there are even lines blunt talkers and unprofessional politicians should not cross. Decency is one of those lines."

Blaming Kelly's "time of the month" for her perceived attack is "political correctness"?  Schoolyard insults of Erickson?  What's wrong with these people? 

Trump's assault on common decency is hardly a sign of strength.  It demonstrates an irrational insecurity that should trouble any Republican interested in winning the election in 2016.  And juvenile name-calling is a sign of weakness – an inability to respond to criticism.  Trump's bombast notwithstanding, his attack on Kelly shows a pathological inability to accept criticism.  Erickson was absolutely right in disinviting him, and it would be nice if other Republican organizations followed his lead.

Donald Trump was scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the conservative RedState political conference in Atlanta tonoght.

But citing his comments about Fox News debate moderator Megyn Kelly, RedState chief Erick Erickson has disinvited him.  In Trump's place, Erickson invited the target of Trump's bullying – Megyn Kelly.

Reuters:

"While I have tried to give him great latitude, his remark about Megyn Kelly was a bridge too far," Erickson said, adding he had invited Kelly, one of Fox's highest profile anchors, to attend his conference in Trump's place.

Trump was unbowed by the dumping.

"This is just another example of weakness through being politically correct," his campaign said in a statement.

"For all of the people who were looking forward to Mr. Trump coming, we will miss you. Blame Erick Erickson, your weak and pathetic leader. We'll now be doing another campaign stop at another location."

During the debate, Kelly asked Trump to respond to derogatory statements he had made in the past about women, calling them "fat pigs" for example. Trump tried to wave off the question and dismissed Kelly during a raucous debate performance.

"And honestly Megyn, if you don't like it, I'm sorry," Trump said. "I've been very nice to you, although I could probably maybe not be, based on the way you have treated me. But I wouldn't do that."

Erickson said in a Facebook statement that in a CNN interview Trump said of Kelly: "You could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her wherever."

"His comment was inappropriate," said Erickson.

"It is unfortunate to have to disinvite him. But I just don't want someone on stage who gets a hostile question from a lady and his first inclination is to imply it was hormonal. It just was wrong," he said.

"He is not a professional politician and is known for being a blunt talker. But there are even lines blunt talkers and unprofessional politicians should not cross. Decency is one of those lines."

Blaming Kelly's "time of the month" for her perceived attack is "political correctness"?  Schoolyard insults of Erickson?  What's wrong with these people? 

Trump's assault on common decency is hardly a sign of strength.  It demonstrates an irrational insecurity that should trouble any Republican interested in winning the election in 2016.  And juvenile name-calling is a sign of weakness – an inability to respond to criticism.  Trump's bombast notwithstanding, his attack on Kelly shows a pathological inability to accept criticism.  Erickson was absolutely right in disinviting him, and it would be nice if other Republican organizations followed his lead.