Senior Iranian official declares that it holds right of approval over any nuclear inspectors

The assurances President Obama and John Kerry offered on tough inspections of Iranian nuclear facilities have crumbled into meaninglessness. First, the “anytime, anywhere” slogan fell to only the sites the Iranians approve, and 24 days’ notice. Now, with the latest statement out of Tehran, it is apparent that even those late, limited inspections will be a joke. Adam Kredo of the Free Beacon reports:

Sayyed Abbas Araqchi, Iran’s deputy foreign minister and one of the top negotiators in talks that led to the recently inked nuclear deal, told the country’s state-controlled press that Iran’s intelligence apparatus must approve of any inspector who is issued a visa to enter Iran.

As Paul Mirengoff points out, we have no way of knowing if this is part of the deal agreed to by the Obama administration, because we aren’t allowed to see that deal. And it hardly matters, because the Iranians control access to their country, so what they say the deal is, is all that matters.

Now, what kind of Senator or Representative would be willing to endorse a deal in which the object of suspicion gets to delay inspections and holds the right of approval over any inspectors? If they think that’s OK for Iran, which threatens us with nuclear weapons and ICBMs in ten years or so, how about we use that same system for the IRS? If we had the right of approval for the IRS auditors who inspect our tax returns, who would bother to pay taxes?

The assurances President Obama and John Kerry offered on tough inspections of Iranian nuclear facilities have crumbled into meaninglessness. First, the “anytime, anywhere” slogan fell to only the sites the Iranians approve, and 24 days’ notice. Now, with the latest statement out of Tehran, it is apparent that even those late, limited inspections will be a joke. Adam Kredo of the Free Beacon reports:

Sayyed Abbas Araqchi, Iran’s deputy foreign minister and one of the top negotiators in talks that led to the recently inked nuclear deal, told the country’s state-controlled press that Iran’s intelligence apparatus must approve of any inspector who is issued a visa to enter Iran.

As Paul Mirengoff points out, we have no way of knowing if this is part of the deal agreed to by the Obama administration, because we aren’t allowed to see that deal. And it hardly matters, because the Iranians control access to their country, so what they say the deal is, is all that matters.

Now, what kind of Senator or Representative would be willing to endorse a deal in which the object of suspicion gets to delay inspections and holds the right of approval over any inspectors? If they think that’s OK for Iran, which threatens us with nuclear weapons and ICBMs in ten years or so, how about we use that same system for the IRS? If we had the right of approval for the IRS auditors who inspect our tax returns, who would bother to pay taxes?