Professor arrested in racial profiling hoax

False claims of racism and hate crimes related to sexuality seem to be endemic. So desirable is the status of victim that some people, especially those in academia, have been known to vandalize their own cars, attach nooses to their office doors, and otherwise fabricate hate crimes against themselves.  Oberlin College, with a history of hysteria over fake hate crimes, even generated worldwide headlines for its overwrought response to a series of “hate crimes” that turned out to be false.

We don’t know what percentage of hate crime reports are self-generated hoaxes by the purported victims.  Often there is no evidence.  But as far as false claims against police go, the spread of cruiser and body cameras is helping us get a handle on the matter.  Thus, this report from Connecticut is encouraging.  Fox CT reports:

A professor at a local community college has been arrested after allegedly claiming an officer racially profiled her, when he didn’t.

On May 9, Minati Roychoudhuri, 32, of Storrs, was driving near exit 85 on Route 15 when she was pulled over. She was cited for failure to drive in the established lane.

The good professor sent the following letter to the state commissioner of public safety:

Dear Sir/Madam

I was traveling to Wethersfield on Route 15/5 to attend a meeting 9th May. I was on the left lane on route 15 and had to take exit 85. After the Brainard Airport exit, and after the merging lane ended, I signaled and went to the right lane to take exit 85. An unmarked police car with flashing light stopped me on the ramp after I had taken the exit. The policeman asked me if I could speak English and if I knew why he had stopped me. I said, “yes” to speaking English and “no” to why he had stopped me. He then asked me for my driver’s license and registration. He returned with an envelope and said that I could simply mail in the infraction.

The officer did not give me any reason as to why had stopped me. His asking if I could speak English shows that he had racially profiled me and was not able to give me a concrete reason for stopping me. Further, the officer had checked “Hispanic” in the race category in the infraction ticket. I am a Professor in English at Capital Community College, I teach about diversity and the negative impact of racial profiling, I have now become a target of the same insidious behavior! It is easy to connect the dots with the nationwide racial profiling which has led to serious consequences. I request that my infraction charges be dropped and action be taken against the officer. I have talked with the Senator and Legislator of my constituency regarding this matter and I am sending a copy of this letter to them as well.

Thank you in advance, Sincerely, Minati Roychoudhuri

Unbeknownst to her, most Connecticut State Police cruisers have video and audio camera to record all stops made by troopers.  Here is what the recording revealed:

Officer: Hi ma’am, do you know why I’m stopping you today?

Roychoudhuri: No

Officer: OK. There’s that big gore area with white lines painted across it and you cut in front of it, in front of me, thinking it’s a lane or something. You have to wait until it’s a dotted white line. License and registration.

(She handed him insurance, so he requested the registration again, which she gave him)

Officer: Thank you. This is for your Subaru car.

Roychoudhuri: This is my Subaru car.

Officer: Is this a station wagon, color green? The plate doesn’t match what’s on there.

Roychoudhuri: [Inaudible]…I thought that was my [inaudible]

Officer: I’ll run the plate and see what it comes back with.

Roychoudhuri: This is the [inaudible] that I have.

(Officer returns to his car for three minutes to write out the ticket for failure to drive in the established lane)

Officer: Ma’am. So I wrote you the infraction for that improper lane change that you did.

Roychoudhuri: Please, you know, I probably crossed over there, and that’s why I did it.

Officer: OK.

Roychoudhuri: Obviously I did that.

Officer: [Inaudible]

Roychoudhuri: My [inaudible] is absolutely clean.

Officer: Ok. So I wrote you an infraction for that improper lane change that you did.

Roychoudhuri: OK.

Officer: The answer date is on the front of it and the instructions are on the back of it.

Roychoudhuri: Wait, what?

Officer: It’s a mail in infraction. All you have to do is mail in, either a check or money order, and mail it in.

Roychoudhuri: OK.

Officer: Alright.

Roychoudhuri: Thank you.

The good professor was interviewed by internal affairs investigators and repeated her claims in a sworn statement.

As a result, she has now been arrested for making a false statement.  Her employer has been notified with the following letter from the State Police:

False claims of hate crimes damage society, severely creating social tensions and hatred.  I would like to see the penalties for false reports equal the penalties for the crime falsely claimed.  In this case, the professor teaches about racial profiling and is clearly poisoning young minds with her delusional approach to facts.

Hat tip: David Paulin

Photo credit: Capital Community College

False claims of racism and hate crimes related to sexuality seem to be endemic. So desirable is the status of victim that some people, especially those in academia, have been known to vandalize their own cars, attach nooses to their office doors, and otherwise fabricate hate crimes against themselves.  Oberlin College, with a history of hysteria over fake hate crimes, even generated worldwide headlines for its overwrought response to a series of “hate crimes” that turned out to be false.

We don’t know what percentage of hate crime reports are self-generated hoaxes by the purported victims.  Often there is no evidence.  But as far as false claims against police go, the spread of cruiser and body cameras is helping us get a handle on the matter.  Thus, this report from Connecticut is encouraging.  Fox CT reports:

A professor at a local community college has been arrested after allegedly claiming an officer racially profiled her, when he didn’t.

On May 9, Minati Roychoudhuri, 32, of Storrs, was driving near exit 85 on Route 15 when she was pulled over. She was cited for failure to drive in the established lane.

The good professor sent the following letter to the state commissioner of public safety:

Dear Sir/Madam

I was traveling to Wethersfield on Route 15/5 to attend a meeting 9th May. I was on the left lane on route 15 and had to take exit 85. After the Brainard Airport exit, and after the merging lane ended, I signaled and went to the right lane to take exit 85. An unmarked police car with flashing light stopped me on the ramp after I had taken the exit. The policeman asked me if I could speak English and if I knew why he had stopped me. I said, “yes” to speaking English and “no” to why he had stopped me. He then asked me for my driver’s license and registration. He returned with an envelope and said that I could simply mail in the infraction.

The officer did not give me any reason as to why had stopped me. His asking if I could speak English shows that he had racially profiled me and was not able to give me a concrete reason for stopping me. Further, the officer had checked “Hispanic” in the race category in the infraction ticket. I am a Professor in English at Capital Community College, I teach about diversity and the negative impact of racial profiling, I have now become a target of the same insidious behavior! It is easy to connect the dots with the nationwide racial profiling which has led to serious consequences. I request that my infraction charges be dropped and action be taken against the officer. I have talked with the Senator and Legislator of my constituency regarding this matter and I am sending a copy of this letter to them as well.

Thank you in advance, Sincerely, Minati Roychoudhuri

Unbeknownst to her, most Connecticut State Police cruisers have video and audio camera to record all stops made by troopers.  Here is what the recording revealed:

Officer: Hi ma’am, do you know why I’m stopping you today?

Roychoudhuri: No

Officer: OK. There’s that big gore area with white lines painted across it and you cut in front of it, in front of me, thinking it’s a lane or something. You have to wait until it’s a dotted white line. License and registration.

(She handed him insurance, so he requested the registration again, which she gave him)

Officer: Thank you. This is for your Subaru car.

Roychoudhuri: This is my Subaru car.

Officer: Is this a station wagon, color green? The plate doesn’t match what’s on there.

Roychoudhuri: [Inaudible]…I thought that was my [inaudible]

Officer: I’ll run the plate and see what it comes back with.

Roychoudhuri: This is the [inaudible] that I have.

(Officer returns to his car for three minutes to write out the ticket for failure to drive in the established lane)

Officer: Ma’am. So I wrote you the infraction for that improper lane change that you did.

Roychoudhuri: Please, you know, I probably crossed over there, and that’s why I did it.

Officer: OK.

Roychoudhuri: Obviously I did that.

Officer: [Inaudible]

Roychoudhuri: My [inaudible] is absolutely clean.

Officer: Ok. So I wrote you an infraction for that improper lane change that you did.

Roychoudhuri: OK.

Officer: The answer date is on the front of it and the instructions are on the back of it.

Roychoudhuri: Wait, what?

Officer: It’s a mail in infraction. All you have to do is mail in, either a check or money order, and mail it in.

Roychoudhuri: OK.

Officer: Alright.

Roychoudhuri: Thank you.

The good professor was interviewed by internal affairs investigators and repeated her claims in a sworn statement.

As a result, she has now been arrested for making a false statement.  Her employer has been notified with the following letter from the State Police:

False claims of hate crimes damage society, severely creating social tensions and hatred.  I would like to see the penalties for false reports equal the penalties for the crime falsely claimed.  In this case, the professor teaches about racial profiling and is clearly poisoning young minds with her delusional approach to facts.

Hat tip: David Paulin

Photo credit: Capital Community College