Kill Dylann Roof

Dylann Roof entered not guilty pleas on 33 federal charges for his killing spree in the black church in Charleston.

The angelic families of the dead in Charleston  want to forgive Dylann.  They are holy people.  They don’t understand the pragmatism of a world where crime deserves retribution.  They don’t understand that retribution can prevent future crime.  That a society should have a gestalt of vengeance rather than mercy.

A society that senses that violence is wrong and ugly discourages future violence.  Revenge is societal kindness, whereas mercy is a failure to rid civilization of chaos.

To protest the death penalty for Roof is an insult to society and an encouragement to commit crimes.

Killing Roof won’t bring his victims back.  That’s impossible.  It will say that the crime was so horrible that to look on the killer kindly would be encouraging future killers to kill, as if their crimes didn’t matter.

Every day I pick up a newspaper and pick up another story about a shooting.  This should not be.  The more we punish the killers, the more we admit that crime is wrong.

How irresponsible to have a society where forgiveness supersedes punishment and violence is encouraged by its lack of penalties.  The families of the dead at Charleston owe it to the rest of society to petition for the death penalty.

Lame, academic sociologists feel that the death penalty  doesn’t inhibit crimes.  Why don’t they go to death row and visit with prisoners who are constantly writing legal briefs to get their sentences commuted to life in jail? 

No one wants to die.  And murderers' aversion to their own deaths is the reason why they must be executed: to discourage future murders.

If I killed someone, I wouldn’t want to be forgiven.  Criminals tend to have more honor than academics.

Liberals don’t know how to fight evil and the milieu of evil.  Kindness toward evil turns the scales of justice on the side of evil.

Dylann Roof entered not guilty pleas on 33 federal charges for his killing spree in the black church in Charleston.

The angelic families of the dead in Charleston  want to forgive Dylann.  They are holy people.  They don’t understand the pragmatism of a world where crime deserves retribution.  They don’t understand that retribution can prevent future crime.  That a society should have a gestalt of vengeance rather than mercy.

A society that senses that violence is wrong and ugly discourages future violence.  Revenge is societal kindness, whereas mercy is a failure to rid civilization of chaos.

To protest the death penalty for Roof is an insult to society and an encouragement to commit crimes.

Killing Roof won’t bring his victims back.  That’s impossible.  It will say that the crime was so horrible that to look on the killer kindly would be encouraging future killers to kill, as if their crimes didn’t matter.

Every day I pick up a newspaper and pick up another story about a shooting.  This should not be.  The more we punish the killers, the more we admit that crime is wrong.

How irresponsible to have a society where forgiveness supersedes punishment and violence is encouraged by its lack of penalties.  The families of the dead at Charleston owe it to the rest of society to petition for the death penalty.

Lame, academic sociologists feel that the death penalty  doesn’t inhibit crimes.  Why don’t they go to death row and visit with prisoners who are constantly writing legal briefs to get their sentences commuted to life in jail? 

No one wants to die.  And murderers' aversion to their own deaths is the reason why they must be executed: to discourage future murders.

If I killed someone, I wouldn’t want to be forgiven.  Criminals tend to have more honor than academics.

Liberals don’t know how to fight evil and the milieu of evil.  Kindness toward evil turns the scales of justice on the side of evil.