Hillary goes to Vegas, loses big with performance at press conference

Wearing a prison-orange pantsuit yesterday, Hillary Clinton dug the hole she occupies several feet deeper with Tuesday’s North Las Vegas gym presser.  Even normally supportive liberal pundits were appalled at her performance. Ron Fournier of the National Journal, who has known and been fond of the Clintons since covering them in Little Rock, counted six separate lies, evasions, and mis-directions in appearances on Fox News and MSNBC. Even Chris Matthews was shocked, discussing the presser on MSNBC’s Morning Joe this morning.

Ed Henry of Fox News distinguished himself, pressing Mrs. Clinton for nearly five minutes, asking tough questions, to which the responses were flip, using the playbook prepared by campaign communications director Jennifer Palmieri, relying on lies and evasions.

The lowest point came when, in response to Henry pressing her, on whether she had had the drive wiped, she responded, “What? Like with a cloth or something?” she asked, then laughed. “I don’t know how it works digitally at all.”

This is an unbelievably stupid attempt to use humor, reflecting an attempt to mock and therefore dismiss legitimate concerns. Like her joke in a speech over the weekend about preferring Snapchat because the messages delete themselves, it only demonstrates arrogance toward legitimate queries. Perhaps the fact that she had just addressed an adoring crowd for an hour before walking into the gym led her to believe that only a few crazies are interested in the jeopardy she placed national security in.

It appears that surrounding herself with yes-women, has given her a warped understanding of the national mood:

As she exited the gymnasium, a reporter asked her if the questions were an indication that the email controversy isn’t going away, and will dog her campaign into next year.

Clinton turned around, her hands raised in the air in a shrug. “Nobody talked to me about it — other than you guys,” she said, and then exited with her top aides around her

Real Clear Politics summarizes the rest of the conference (video below):

"Isn't leadership about taking responsibility?" Ed Henry asked Clinton first.

"Look, I take responsibility," Clinton said. "This didn't turn out to be convenient at all and I regret that this has become such a cause celebre. But this does not change the facts and no matter what anybody tries to say, the facts are stubborn."

"What I did was legally permitted," she added.

Clinton flatly said she did not send or receive any classified documents that went through her personal e-mail account on her private server.

"Whether it was a personal account or a government account, I did not send classified material and I did not receive any material that was marked or designated classified, which is the way you know whether something is," she said.

"The FBI believes you tried to wipe the entire server," Henry stated. "Did you try to wipe the entire [server] so that there would be no emails, no personal or no official?"

"Well, my personal e-mails are my personal business, right?" Clinton responded.

HILLARY CLINTON: Look, I take responsibility. Look, I just told Jeff, in retrospect, this didn't turn out to be convenient at all and I regret that this has become such a cause celebre. But this does not change the facts and no matter what anybody tries to say, the facts are stubborn. What I did was legally permitted, number one, first and foremost, okay? Number two, I turned over -- out of an abundance of an attempt to be helpful -- over anything that I even thought was even vaguely related. In fact, they've already concluded more than 1,200 of the e-mails I gave them have nothing to do with the work, and I said make them public. And that's the process that one goes through to make them public. So, I know there's a certain level of, you know, sort of anxiety or interest in this, but the facts are the facts.

(ED HENRY INAUDIBLE)

Ed, you're not listening to me -- Ed, if it were -- well, if it were a government account, they would be saying the same thing. The fact -- no, no, no. Well, look -- first of all, that is not in any way agreed upon. State Department disagrees. That happens all the time in these efforts to say what can go out and what can't go out. That is a part of the ordinary process.

Everybody is acting like this is the first time it's ever happened. It happens all the time. And I can only tell you that the State Department has said over and over again, we disagree. So, that's what they're sorting out and that's what happens a lot of the times. But whether it was a personal account or a government account, I did not send classified material and I did not receive any material that was marked or designated classified, which is the way you know whether something is.

What you're seeing now is a disagreement between agencies saying, you know what? They should have. And the other saying no, they shouldn't. That has nothing to do with me. If it had been a government account and I said release it, we'd be having the same arguments.

ED HENRY, FOX NEWS: The FBI believes you tried to wipe the entire server. Did you try to wipe the entire -- so that there would be no emails, no personal or no official?

CLINTON: Well, my personal e-mails are my personal business, right?

Here is the video:

 

Wearing a prison-orange pantsuit yesterday, Hillary Clinton dug the hole she occupies several feet deeper with Tuesday’s North Las Vegas gym presser.  Even normally supportive liberal pundits were appalled at her performance. Ron Fournier of the National Journal, who has known and been fond of the Clintons since covering them in Little Rock, counted six separate lies, evasions, and mis-directions in appearances on Fox News and MSNBC. Even Chris Matthews was shocked, discussing the presser on MSNBC’s Morning Joe this morning.

Ed Henry of Fox News distinguished himself, pressing Mrs. Clinton for nearly five minutes, asking tough questions, to which the responses were flip, using the playbook prepared by campaign communications director Jennifer Palmieri, relying on lies and evasions.

The lowest point came when, in response to Henry pressing her, on whether she had had the drive wiped, she responded, “What? Like with a cloth or something?” she asked, then laughed. “I don’t know how it works digitally at all.”

This is an unbelievably stupid attempt to use humor, reflecting an attempt to mock and therefore dismiss legitimate concerns. Like her joke in a speech over the weekend about preferring Snapchat because the messages delete themselves, it only demonstrates arrogance toward legitimate queries. Perhaps the fact that she had just addressed an adoring crowd for an hour before walking into the gym led her to believe that only a few crazies are interested in the jeopardy she placed national security in.

It appears that surrounding herself with yes-women, has given her a warped understanding of the national mood:

As she exited the gymnasium, a reporter asked her if the questions were an indication that the email controversy isn’t going away, and will dog her campaign into next year.

Clinton turned around, her hands raised in the air in a shrug. “Nobody talked to me about it — other than you guys,” she said, and then exited with her top aides around her

Real Clear Politics summarizes the rest of the conference (video below):

"Isn't leadership about taking responsibility?" Ed Henry asked Clinton first.

"Look, I take responsibility," Clinton said. "This didn't turn out to be convenient at all and I regret that this has become such a cause celebre. But this does not change the facts and no matter what anybody tries to say, the facts are stubborn."

"What I did was legally permitted," she added.

Clinton flatly said she did not send or receive any classified documents that went through her personal e-mail account on her private server.

"Whether it was a personal account or a government account, I did not send classified material and I did not receive any material that was marked or designated classified, which is the way you know whether something is," she said.

"The FBI believes you tried to wipe the entire server," Henry stated. "Did you try to wipe the entire [server] so that there would be no emails, no personal or no official?"

"Well, my personal e-mails are my personal business, right?" Clinton responded.

HILLARY CLINTON: Look, I take responsibility. Look, I just told Jeff, in retrospect, this didn't turn out to be convenient at all and I regret that this has become such a cause celebre. But this does not change the facts and no matter what anybody tries to say, the facts are stubborn. What I did was legally permitted, number one, first and foremost, okay? Number two, I turned over -- out of an abundance of an attempt to be helpful -- over anything that I even thought was even vaguely related. In fact, they've already concluded more than 1,200 of the e-mails I gave them have nothing to do with the work, and I said make them public. And that's the process that one goes through to make them public. So, I know there's a certain level of, you know, sort of anxiety or interest in this, but the facts are the facts.

(ED HENRY INAUDIBLE)

Ed, you're not listening to me -- Ed, if it were -- well, if it were a government account, they would be saying the same thing. The fact -- no, no, no. Well, look -- first of all, that is not in any way agreed upon. State Department disagrees. That happens all the time in these efforts to say what can go out and what can't go out. That is a part of the ordinary process.

Everybody is acting like this is the first time it's ever happened. It happens all the time. And I can only tell you that the State Department has said over and over again, we disagree. So, that's what they're sorting out and that's what happens a lot of the times. But whether it was a personal account or a government account, I did not send classified material and I did not receive any material that was marked or designated classified, which is the way you know whether something is.

What you're seeing now is a disagreement between agencies saying, you know what? They should have. And the other saying no, they shouldn't. That has nothing to do with me. If it had been a government account and I said release it, we'd be having the same arguments.

ED HENRY, FOX NEWS: The FBI believes you tried to wipe the entire server. Did you try to wipe the entire -- so that there would be no emails, no personal or no official?

CLINTON: Well, my personal e-mails are my personal business, right?

Here is the video: