Do you feel the pain of companies cut off from Export-Import Bank subsidies?

Businesses cut off from Export-Import Bank funding are suffering beyond measure , or so they say, as they tell their tales of woe to a sympathetic and appropriately unquestioning Politico:

A small crop-duster manufacturer and a Texas company that exports oil equipment fret about losing 25 percent to 40 percent of their sales. The president of a trade-financing firm says many of his 1,000 clients could see their Christmas season business plummet. And Boeing said Wednesday that it is considering moving portions of its sprawling operations overseas, reversing past efforts to keep manufacturing jobs in the U.S.

That’s all a result of the demise of the Export-Import Bank...

“We’re really frustrated,” said Tyler Schroeder, a financial analyst at the 265-employee company Air Tractor, which makes firefighting and agricultural aircraft and is based in the 3,000-person town of Olney, Texas.

If I were used to getting money from the taxpayer, and it suddenly stopped, I would be frustrated, too!

... “We’re at a loss how Congress can literally go on vacation and just say, ‘Good luck, guys.’”

He's right.  How irresponsible is it for Congress to go on vacation without making adequate provision for taxpayer subsidies of large corporations?

Gary Mendell, president of trade financier Meridian Finance Group, said export credit agencies in other countries are already taking advantage of Ex-Im’s expiration to lure away business from U.S. companies.

You see?  This is what we get for shutting down the Export-Import Bank.  When the government steps back, the private sector takes over and scoops away business that the government should be managing!

Ex-Im’s federal authorization expired July 1, to the cheers of conservative lawmakers who view it as a tool for crony capitalism. Already, credit insurance policies are starting to run out for a number of the roughly 3,000 small businesses that rely on them to be able to export.

I think all these 3,000 small businesses added together don't remotely equal the Export-Import subsidies received by Boeing and GE, who get the lion's share of the money.  I think they forgot to mention that in the Politico article.

Rami Touma, president of Houston-based oil equipment exporter CECA Supply & Services, said Ex-Im’s services are critical to his business’s ability to sell products to Algeria, its major source of income.

I'll bet government subsidies could make the difference between profitability and loss for many companies.  Shouldn't the government be subsidizing all businesses so they can all make a profit?

The national Algerian oil company requires exporters to post a 10 percent performance bond, which is held until the job is done. And in the past year, Touma’s 30-employee company had its best year ever, with $60 million in sales

Don't you think that a company with $60 million in revenue is in dire need of government support?

Mendell said small companies looking to export don’t have other options for replacing many of Ex-Im’s services. That’s because the volume of their exports is too small or the market risk is too great for so meager a transaction.

If the market risk is too great, isn't that a compelling argument that taxpayer dollars should be used to bear the risk?

When you see left-wing websites like Politico espousing the same interests as the crony corporatists, you may realize that "Republican" and "Democrat" aren't "wings," but rather a circle with shared interests, like amnesty, government health care, and subsidies for big businesses.

This article was produced by NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

Businesses cut off from Export-Import Bank funding are suffering beyond measure , or so they say, as they tell their tales of woe to a sympathetic and appropriately unquestioning Politico:

A small crop-duster manufacturer and a Texas company that exports oil equipment fret about losing 25 percent to 40 percent of their sales. The president of a trade-financing firm says many of his 1,000 clients could see their Christmas season business plummet. And Boeing said Wednesday that it is considering moving portions of its sprawling operations overseas, reversing past efforts to keep manufacturing jobs in the U.S.

That’s all a result of the demise of the Export-Import Bank...

“We’re really frustrated,” said Tyler Schroeder, a financial analyst at the 265-employee company Air Tractor, which makes firefighting and agricultural aircraft and is based in the 3,000-person town of Olney, Texas.

If I were used to getting money from the taxpayer, and it suddenly stopped, I would be frustrated, too!

... “We’re at a loss how Congress can literally go on vacation and just say, ‘Good luck, guys.’”

He's right.  How irresponsible is it for Congress to go on vacation without making adequate provision for taxpayer subsidies of large corporations?

Gary Mendell, president of trade financier Meridian Finance Group, said export credit agencies in other countries are already taking advantage of Ex-Im’s expiration to lure away business from U.S. companies.

You see?  This is what we get for shutting down the Export-Import Bank.  When the government steps back, the private sector takes over and scoops away business that the government should be managing!

Ex-Im’s federal authorization expired July 1, to the cheers of conservative lawmakers who view it as a tool for crony capitalism. Already, credit insurance policies are starting to run out for a number of the roughly 3,000 small businesses that rely on them to be able to export.

I think all these 3,000 small businesses added together don't remotely equal the Export-Import subsidies received by Boeing and GE, who get the lion's share of the money.  I think they forgot to mention that in the Politico article.

Rami Touma, president of Houston-based oil equipment exporter CECA Supply & Services, said Ex-Im’s services are critical to his business’s ability to sell products to Algeria, its major source of income.

I'll bet government subsidies could make the difference between profitability and loss for many companies.  Shouldn't the government be subsidizing all businesses so they can all make a profit?

The national Algerian oil company requires exporters to post a 10 percent performance bond, which is held until the job is done. And in the past year, Touma’s 30-employee company had its best year ever, with $60 million in sales

Don't you think that a company with $60 million in revenue is in dire need of government support?

Mendell said small companies looking to export don’t have other options for replacing many of Ex-Im’s services. That’s because the volume of their exports is too small or the market risk is too great for so meager a transaction.

If the market risk is too great, isn't that a compelling argument that taxpayer dollars should be used to bear the risk?

When you see left-wing websites like Politico espousing the same interests as the crony corporatists, you may realize that "Republican" and "Democrat" aren't "wings," but rather a circle with shared interests, like amnesty, government health care, and subsidies for big businesses.

This article was produced by NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.