Obamacare plans much worse than predecessors

Investor’s Business Daily summarizes a report from Avalere Health with stunning numbers on the results of Obamacare for policyholders, compared to the health insurance plans previously enjoyed:

... enrollees in ObamaCare plans have access to 34% fewer providers than those who buy a commercial plan outside the exchange. On average, it found, ObamaCare enrollees had 32% fewer primary care doctors and 24% fewer hospitals from which to choose.

Worse, ObamaCare plans covered 42% fewer oncologists and cardiologists than non-ObamaCare plans.

What this means is that lots of patients will end up going out of network to get the care that they need, which means paying far more out-of-pocket costs.

Deductibles are steeper under ObamaCare, too. In ObamaCare's first year, the average deductible for a low-cost Bronze plan was 42% higher than before the law went into effect, according to HealthPocket. Deductibles climbed again this year and are expected to go up the next.

This is typical of what happens when governments intervene in markets to “help” consumers.

Investor’s Business Daily summarizes a report from Avalere Health with stunning numbers on the results of Obamacare for policyholders, compared to the health insurance plans previously enjoyed:

... enrollees in ObamaCare plans have access to 34% fewer providers than those who buy a commercial plan outside the exchange. On average, it found, ObamaCare enrollees had 32% fewer primary care doctors and 24% fewer hospitals from which to choose.

Worse, ObamaCare plans covered 42% fewer oncologists and cardiologists than non-ObamaCare plans.

What this means is that lots of patients will end up going out of network to get the care that they need, which means paying far more out-of-pocket costs.

Deductibles are steeper under ObamaCare, too. In ObamaCare's first year, the average deductible for a low-cost Bronze plan was 42% higher than before the law went into effect, according to HealthPocket. Deductibles climbed again this year and are expected to go up the next.

This is typical of what happens when governments intervene in markets to “help” consumers.