New York City to phase in $15 an hour minimum wage by 2018 for fast food workers

New York has guaranteed there will be fewer fast food outlets and fewer fast food workers as the state's wage board voted to phase in a $15 minimum wage for workers in the fast food industry.

Reuters:

The three-member board was formed at the behest of Governor Andrew Cuomo in May after the state legislature turned down his proposals for minimum wage increases for most workers.

Its decision does not need legislative approval, but requires approval by the state labor commissioner, which is expected.

“This is going to help hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, but this is going to do something else," said a beaming Cuomo at a jubilant rally in New York City celebrating the vote. "Because when New York acts, the rest of the states follow."

With the federal minimum wage at $7.25 an hour since 2009, labor and religious groups have pressed state and local governments to enact pay raises as their hopes dim for an increase by the Republican-controlled U.S. Congress.

Last month, Los Angeles set its minimum wage to rise from $9 an hour to $15 by 2020, affecting some 600,000 workers.

Seattle and San Francisco also have increased minimum wages in recent years.

A statewide wage increase for fast-food workers as opposed to city-based would be a first, said the National Employment Law Project, a nonprofit advocacy group.

The rise to $15 an hour marks a major step from New York's current minimum wage of $8.75.

"I feel fabulous," said Harley Perez, 19, who work 30 hours a week at a fast-food restaurant but depends on food stamps to get by.

"I won't have this chokehold with bills, and I won't need to depend so much on the government for help," she said.

No mention of whether fast food workers are worth $15 an hour, nor is there any indication that these workers understand there are going to be a lot fewer of them by 2018. Franchise operators will try their best to balance labor costs and increased prices by cutting staff to the bone and incrementally hiking the cost of food, but who is going to pay $7, $8, or even $9 for a Big Mac? 

"Fast food" has been targeted for destruction by nanny state nutritionists and social justice warriors. They don't care if these people have jobs. Their goal is not to improve the lives of workers but kill an industry they believe hurts consumers.

Trying to divorce the value of labor from the value of what's being produced is not going to end well for anyone - workers, management, or consumers.

New York has guaranteed there will be fewer fast food outlets and fewer fast food workers as the state's wage board voted to phase in a $15 minimum wage for workers in the fast food industry.

Reuters:

The three-member board was formed at the behest of Governor Andrew Cuomo in May after the state legislature turned down his proposals for minimum wage increases for most workers.

Its decision does not need legislative approval, but requires approval by the state labor commissioner, which is expected.

“This is going to help hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, but this is going to do something else," said a beaming Cuomo at a jubilant rally in New York City celebrating the vote. "Because when New York acts, the rest of the states follow."

With the federal minimum wage at $7.25 an hour since 2009, labor and religious groups have pressed state and local governments to enact pay raises as their hopes dim for an increase by the Republican-controlled U.S. Congress.

Last month, Los Angeles set its minimum wage to rise from $9 an hour to $15 by 2020, affecting some 600,000 workers.

Seattle and San Francisco also have increased minimum wages in recent years.

A statewide wage increase for fast-food workers as opposed to city-based would be a first, said the National Employment Law Project, a nonprofit advocacy group.

The rise to $15 an hour marks a major step from New York's current minimum wage of $8.75.

"I feel fabulous," said Harley Perez, 19, who work 30 hours a week at a fast-food restaurant but depends on food stamps to get by.

"I won't have this chokehold with bills, and I won't need to depend so much on the government for help," she said.

No mention of whether fast food workers are worth $15 an hour, nor is there any indication that these workers understand there are going to be a lot fewer of them by 2018. Franchise operators will try their best to balance labor costs and increased prices by cutting staff to the bone and incrementally hiking the cost of food, but who is going to pay $7, $8, or even $9 for a Big Mac? 

"Fast food" has been targeted for destruction by nanny state nutritionists and social justice warriors. They don't care if these people have jobs. Their goal is not to improve the lives of workers but kill an industry they believe hurts consumers.

Trying to divorce the value of labor from the value of what's being produced is not going to end well for anyone - workers, management, or consumers.