And now for something completely different...from the Rick Perry campaign

I confess to a strong case of ambivalence toward the new Rick Perry presidential campaign commercial embedded below.  On the one hand, with its animation style incorporating elements of South Park and multiple references to popular television shows, it would seem aimed at the younger demographic, especially those immersed in pop culture.  That masks a hard sell on the major theme of the Perry campaign: the record of jobs produced in Texas during his terms as governor.

On the other hand, with the protagonist immersed in television and happily eating a microwaved meal (what appears to be a burrito or maybe a pop tart), it will earn the disdain of the urban hip crowd.  And, well…it doesn’t exactly seem presidential.

Of course, Perry probably has already written off the Whole Foods demographic (which might be a mistake, as they need jobs, too.  I see a lot of people who look as though they could use some cash shopping at the Berkeley Whole Foods, despite its high prices).  See what you think:

I give the campaign kudos for creativity, and I realize that with the painkiller-induced memory lapse of the 2008 presidential debate an albatross for his prospects, Perry needs humor to break through the resistance.  And I confess that despite knowing it is nothing by image work, those black glasses do make him look thoughtful and even smart.  I hate that they work so well on me – not because of Perry, but because of my dissatisfaction with allowing myself to be successfully manipulated by superficialities.  Which brings me back to the commercial.  Maybe it is better than my intellect will allow me to admit.  Maybe manipulation works better on me (and others) than I am willing to admit.

I confess to a strong case of ambivalence toward the new Rick Perry presidential campaign commercial embedded below.  On the one hand, with its animation style incorporating elements of South Park and multiple references to popular television shows, it would seem aimed at the younger demographic, especially those immersed in pop culture.  That masks a hard sell on the major theme of the Perry campaign: the record of jobs produced in Texas during his terms as governor.

On the other hand, with the protagonist immersed in television and happily eating a microwaved meal (what appears to be a burrito or maybe a pop tart), it will earn the disdain of the urban hip crowd.  And, well…it doesn’t exactly seem presidential.

Of course, Perry probably has already written off the Whole Foods demographic (which might be a mistake, as they need jobs, too.  I see a lot of people who look as though they could use some cash shopping at the Berkeley Whole Foods, despite its high prices).  See what you think:

I give the campaign kudos for creativity, and I realize that with the painkiller-induced memory lapse of the 2008 presidential debate an albatross for his prospects, Perry needs humor to break through the resistance.  And I confess that despite knowing it is nothing by image work, those black glasses do make him look thoughtful and even smart.  I hate that they work so well on me – not because of Perry, but because of my dissatisfaction with allowing myself to be successfully manipulated by superficialities.  Which brings me back to the commercial.  Maybe it is better than my intellect will allow me to admit.  Maybe manipulation works better on me (and others) than I am willing to admit.