National Spelling Bee and political correctness

The National Spelling Bee has a new winner.  Actually, two winners, in a tie.  Congratulations to Gokul Venkatachalam, 14, of Chesterfield, Missouri, and Vanya Shivashankar, 13, of Olathe, Kansas.  They join winners of recent years, Sameer Mishra (2008),  Kavya Shivashanka (2009), Anamika Veeramani (2010), Sukanya Roy (2011), Snigdha Nandipati (2012), Arvind Mahankali (2013), and Ansun Sujoe and Sriram Hathwar (2014, tie).

Where’s the outrage?  Political correctness holds that every ethnic group is identical in terms of ability and effort, so that any discrepancy in outcomes is the result of discrimination.  (Except in athletics, of course.)  So the dominance of Indian-Americans must be the result of discrimination.  Or unfairness, such as the heinous practice of reading to your children, thereby unfairly advantaging them.

Given the practices of the Justice Department since the election of President Obama, can an investigation be far behind?

The National Spelling Bee has a new winner.  Actually, two winners, in a tie.  Congratulations to Gokul Venkatachalam, 14, of Chesterfield, Missouri, and Vanya Shivashankar, 13, of Olathe, Kansas.  They join winners of recent years, Sameer Mishra (2008),  Kavya Shivashanka (2009), Anamika Veeramani (2010), Sukanya Roy (2011), Snigdha Nandipati (2012), Arvind Mahankali (2013), and Ansun Sujoe and Sriram Hathwar (2014, tie).

Where’s the outrage?  Political correctness holds that every ethnic group is identical in terms of ability and effort, so that any discrepancy in outcomes is the result of discrimination.  (Except in athletics, of course.)  So the dominance of Indian-Americans must be the result of discrimination.  Or unfairness, such as the heinous practice of reading to your children, thereby unfairly advantaging them.

Given the practices of the Justice Department since the election of President Obama, can an investigation be far behind?