Iran says no inspections of military sites and no access to scientists

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei told his military commanders that he will not allow inspections of any military facilities and will refuse to allow access to Iranian nuclear scientists.

The president's "Fact Sheet" on the framework deal reached in early April says that the IAEA will be able to inspect any site in Iran and can interview its scientists.

Associated Press:

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei told military commanders Wednesday that Iran will resist "coercion and excessive demands" from America and other world powers.

Negotiators from Iran and a six nation group - the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany - have launched a new round of talks in Vienna focused on reaching a final deal that curbs Iran's nuclear program in return for lifting economic sanctions. The two sides reached a framework agreement in March and hope to strike a final deal by June 30.

A fact sheet on the framework accord issued by the U.S. State Department said Iran would be required to grant the U.N. nuclear agency access to any "suspicious sites."

But Khamenei indicated that the Americans are increasing their demands that international inspection of Iran's military sites and interviews with Iranian scientists be included in the final deal.

"The impudent and brazen enemy expects that we allow them talk to our scientists and researchers about a fundamental local achievement but no such permission will be allowed," Khamenei told military commanders in Tehran Wednesday, in remarks broadcast on state TV. "No inspection of any military site or interview with nuclear scientists will be allowed."

Khamenei said interviewing Iranian nuclear scientists would be an affront to Iran's dignity.

"I will not allow foreigners to interview - which is tantamount to interrogation - the prominent beloved scientists and sons of this nation," he said.

Ali Akbar Velayati, a senior adviser to Khamenei, was quoted by Iranian media this week as accusing the Americans of changing their position and toughening their stance as the deadline approaches.

"They insist on crossing (our) red lines. This turns into an obstacle," Velayati was quoted as saying.

More opportunity for a U.S. cave-in to Iran on issues that the president has used to sell his deal to Congress.  Previously, the president's announcement that sanctions would be lifted gradually over a period of years was torpedoed by Iran, who says that all sanctions will be lifted immediately.

When the final deal is reached – and Obama hasn't come this far for him to envision any other outcome – Obama will no doubt repeat these talking points as being part of the agreement.  The fact that the Iranians refuse to acknowledge the U.S. position on these issues should be looked at very carefully by Congress before they sign off on the deal. 

Other issues, like the status of nuclear enrichment at Fordow, the number of centrifuges, and the ability of Iran to improve its enrichment process are also points of disagreement between what Obama says the U.S. negotiated and what Iran thinks the deal says.  What this means is that before a final agreement is reached, it is likely that the U.S. will come around to the Iranian point of view on all of these issues in order to get Iran to sign.

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei told his military commanders that he will not allow inspections of any military facilities and will refuse to allow access to Iranian nuclear scientists.

The president's "Fact Sheet" on the framework deal reached in early April says that the IAEA will be able to inspect any site in Iran and can interview its scientists.

Associated Press:

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei told military commanders Wednesday that Iran will resist "coercion and excessive demands" from America and other world powers.

Negotiators from Iran and a six nation group - the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany - have launched a new round of talks in Vienna focused on reaching a final deal that curbs Iran's nuclear program in return for lifting economic sanctions. The two sides reached a framework agreement in March and hope to strike a final deal by June 30.

A fact sheet on the framework accord issued by the U.S. State Department said Iran would be required to grant the U.N. nuclear agency access to any "suspicious sites."

But Khamenei indicated that the Americans are increasing their demands that international inspection of Iran's military sites and interviews with Iranian scientists be included in the final deal.

"The impudent and brazen enemy expects that we allow them talk to our scientists and researchers about a fundamental local achievement but no such permission will be allowed," Khamenei told military commanders in Tehran Wednesday, in remarks broadcast on state TV. "No inspection of any military site or interview with nuclear scientists will be allowed."

Khamenei said interviewing Iranian nuclear scientists would be an affront to Iran's dignity.

"I will not allow foreigners to interview - which is tantamount to interrogation - the prominent beloved scientists and sons of this nation," he said.

Ali Akbar Velayati, a senior adviser to Khamenei, was quoted by Iranian media this week as accusing the Americans of changing their position and toughening their stance as the deadline approaches.

"They insist on crossing (our) red lines. This turns into an obstacle," Velayati was quoted as saying.

More opportunity for a U.S. cave-in to Iran on issues that the president has used to sell his deal to Congress.  Previously, the president's announcement that sanctions would be lifted gradually over a period of years was torpedoed by Iran, who says that all sanctions will be lifted immediately.

When the final deal is reached – and Obama hasn't come this far for him to envision any other outcome – Obama will no doubt repeat these talking points as being part of the agreement.  The fact that the Iranians refuse to acknowledge the U.S. position on these issues should be looked at very carefully by Congress before they sign off on the deal. 

Other issues, like the status of nuclear enrichment at Fordow, the number of centrifuges, and the ability of Iran to improve its enrichment process are also points of disagreement between what Obama says the U.S. negotiated and what Iran thinks the deal says.  What this means is that before a final agreement is reached, it is likely that the U.S. will come around to the Iranian point of view on all of these issues in order to get Iran to sign.