Did Sid Vicious trip himself up over the Foreign Agents Registration Act?

If the Obama administration were remotely as honest as the Nixon administration was, the attorney general would be investigating Sidney Blumenthal over his potential offenses in violation of the Foreign Agents Registration Act. We know about the potential infraction due to the work of Romanian hacker Guccifer and Edward Snowden, rather than anything found on the sanitized version of Hillary Clinton’s email server.  

Brendan Bordelon of National Review outlines the potential peril Sid Vicious would find himself in, if AG Loretta Lynch is more ho nest than her predecessor Eric Holder, who found nothing prosecution-worthy about the New Black Panthers caught on tape intimidating voters.

Clinton consigliere Sidney Blumenthal’s now-notorious e-mails to Hillary Clinton on Libya could constitute a criminal violation of U.S. foreign lobbying laws. According to several experts, if his business and intelligence ties with Libyan interim government officials were as extensive as evidence suggests, Blumenthal’s repeated communications to America’s top diplomat broke a federal criminal statute requiring the registration and reporting of foreign agents engaged in lobbying foreign officials. “I think there is both smell and smoke,” says Elliot Berke, a Washington D.C. lawyer who works regularly on cases involving the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). (snip)

…the “confidential” intelligence memos on Libya that Blumenthal sent to Clinton starting in early 2011 raise questions about his compliance with FARA. Two of these memos in particular — both of which were passed on by Clinton to State Department subordinates — cast doubt on Blumenthal’s recent claim that he acted only as “a private citizen and friend” providing “interesting or useful” information. (snip)

E-mails leaked by the hacker Guccifer and published by Gawker reveal Blumenthal’s pecuniary interest in the hiring of foreign-security contractors. They show Blumenthal helping advise and facilitate the work of Osprey Global Solutions, an American private-security firm that was in the process of being hired by the transitional Libyan government when the memo was sent in April.

The gigantic problem, of course, is that we lack critical details.  Maybe a subpoena for Blumenthal’s email server would provide them, but that would require a Department of Justice anxious to uncover wrongdoing by a key figure in the Clinton apparatus, something that could discredit the Democrats’ brand.

If the Obama administration were remotely as honest as the Nixon administration was, the attorney general would be investigating Sidney Blumenthal over his potential offenses in violation of the Foreign Agents Registration Act. We know about the potential infraction due to the work of Romanian hacker Guccifer and Edward Snowden, rather than anything found on the sanitized version of Hillary Clinton’s email server.  

Brendan Bordelon of National Review outlines the potential peril Sid Vicious would find himself in, if AG Loretta Lynch is more ho nest than her predecessor Eric Holder, who found nothing prosecution-worthy about the New Black Panthers caught on tape intimidating voters.

Clinton consigliere Sidney Blumenthal’s now-notorious e-mails to Hillary Clinton on Libya could constitute a criminal violation of U.S. foreign lobbying laws. According to several experts, if his business and intelligence ties with Libyan interim government officials were as extensive as evidence suggests, Blumenthal’s repeated communications to America’s top diplomat broke a federal criminal statute requiring the registration and reporting of foreign agents engaged in lobbying foreign officials. “I think there is both smell and smoke,” says Elliot Berke, a Washington D.C. lawyer who works regularly on cases involving the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). (snip)

…the “confidential” intelligence memos on Libya that Blumenthal sent to Clinton starting in early 2011 raise questions about his compliance with FARA. Two of these memos in particular — both of which were passed on by Clinton to State Department subordinates — cast doubt on Blumenthal’s recent claim that he acted only as “a private citizen and friend” providing “interesting or useful” information. (snip)

E-mails leaked by the hacker Guccifer and published by Gawker reveal Blumenthal’s pecuniary interest in the hiring of foreign-security contractors. They show Blumenthal helping advise and facilitate the work of Osprey Global Solutions, an American private-security firm that was in the process of being hired by the transitional Libyan government when the memo was sent in April.

The gigantic problem, of course, is that we lack critical details.  Maybe a subpoena for Blumenthal’s email server would provide them, but that would require a Department of Justice anxious to uncover wrongdoing by a key figure in the Clinton apparatus, something that could discredit the Democrats’ brand.