Clintons earned $25 million in speaking fees since start of 2014

Bill and Hillary Clinton earned $25 million from about 100 speeches since the start of 2014, according to a report from the Federal Election Commission.

Hillary's paid speaking engagements became the source of controversy before she announced for president, charging $225,000 to address UINLV in June of last year.  After that, she accepted few invitations to speak until forgoing giving paid speeches altogether.

The Hill:

The Clintons’ effective tax rate in 2014 was over 30 percent, according to Bloomberg, and the couple did not have any capital gains on their investments. 
 
The Clintons’ finances have been a source of significant scrutiny since Hillary Clinton’s last bid for the White House in 2008, as both have been in high demand on the lavish speaking circuit. 
 
She's filed personal financial disclosure forms throughout her Senate career, as well as others during her previous bid for president and as secretary of State.
 
Hillary Clinton stopped giving paid speeches as she neared her presidential announcement. But Bill Clinton defended his decision to continue on the speaking circuit during his wife’s candidacy in an interview this month with NBC News.
 
“I got to pay our bills,” says Bill Clinton. he said when asked why he wants to continue taking paid speaking roles. Clinton also noted he gives about 10 percent of his yearly revenue to the Clinton Foundation. 
Let's face it: $25 million will pay a lot of bills.  It will also pay down the national debt of some small countries.  For a multi-millionaire to make such an outrageous statement, trying to make himself appear to be an ordinary American struggling to put food on the table and stay out of hock, is obscene.
 
The Clintons will always be the Clintons: grasping, greedy, and seeking to enrich themselves at the expense of a gullible public. 

Bill and Hillary Clinton earned $25 million from about 100 speeches since the start of 2014, according to a report from the Federal Election Commission.

Hillary's paid speaking engagements became the source of controversy before she announced for president, charging $225,000 to address UINLV in June of last year.  After that, she accepted few invitations to speak until forgoing giving paid speeches altogether.

The Hill:

The Clintons’ effective tax rate in 2014 was over 30 percent, according to Bloomberg, and the couple did not have any capital gains on their investments. 
 
The Clintons’ finances have been a source of significant scrutiny since Hillary Clinton’s last bid for the White House in 2008, as both have been in high demand on the lavish speaking circuit. 
 
She's filed personal financial disclosure forms throughout her Senate career, as well as others during her previous bid for president and as secretary of State.
 
Hillary Clinton stopped giving paid speeches as she neared her presidential announcement. But Bill Clinton defended his decision to continue on the speaking circuit during his wife’s candidacy in an interview this month with NBC News.
 
“I got to pay our bills,” says Bill Clinton. he said when asked why he wants to continue taking paid speaking roles. Clinton also noted he gives about 10 percent of his yearly revenue to the Clinton Foundation. 
Let's face it: $25 million will pay a lot of bills.  It will also pay down the national debt of some small countries.  For a multi-millionaire to make such an outrageous statement, trying to make himself appear to be an ordinary American struggling to put food on the table and stay out of hock, is obscene.
 
The Clintons will always be the Clintons: grasping, greedy, and seeking to enrich themselves at the expense of a gullible public.