Breaking: George Stephanopoulos donated $50k to Clinton Foundation, did not disclose when interviewing Peter Schweizer

Update: Even worse, it's now $75K that he cops to. See also further update below.

The last nail in the coffin of MSM credibility? Dylan Byers of Politico reports:

ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos has given $50,000 to the Clinton Foundation in recent years, charitable contributions that he did not publicly disclose while reporting on the Clintons or their non-profit organization, the On Media blog has learned.

In both 2013 and 2014, Stephanopoulos made a $25,000 donation to the 501 nonprofit founded by former president Bill Clinton, the Foundation's records show. Stephanopoulos never disclosed this information to viewers, even when interviewing author Peter Schweizer last month about his book "Clinton Cash," which alleges that donations to the Foundation may have influenced some of Hillary Clinton's actions as Secretary of State.

In a statement to the On Media blog on Thursday, Stephanopoulos apologized and said that he should have disclosed the donations to ABC News and its viewers.

Stephanopoulos should not have been allowed to conduct that interview, and his non-disclosure suggests that he is not worthy of trust by his employer or viewers. His attempt to justify the donation echoes the party line about the purportedly valuable “work” the Foundation does, by which people never mean funding private jet travel for the Clintons, or offering salaries to Hillary’s campaign staff in between campaigns.

 "I made charitable donations to the Foundation in support of the work they’re doing on global AIDS prevention and deforestation, causes I care about deeply," he said. "I thought that my contributions were a matter of public record. However, in hindsight, I should have taken the extra step of personally disclosing my donations to my employer and to the viewehttp://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/21/AR2011012106861.htmlrs on air during the recent news stories about the Foundation. I apologize."

It is time for him to resign, and if he does not, for ABC to fire him.

Update: Jerry Schmitt reminds us that Keith Olbermann left MSNBC after it came out that he had donated to three poiltical campaigns, violating an NBC policy.

Although neither the network nor Olbermann publicly cited a reason for his abrupt departure, the relationship ran into trouble in November when MSNBC suspended Olbermann for two days for making campaign contributions to three political candidates, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), who was severely wounded in a Jan. 8 shooting.

During the campaign-contribution flap, the network said it was acting under an NBC News policy that prohibits political contributions by its employees without prior approval. But Olbermann was publicly unapologetic about his behavior, expressing his disdain for MSNBC's decision when he returned to the air after his suspension - which was the culmination of several run-ins between Olbermann and MSNBC's president, Phil Griffin.

Technically, Stephanopoulos's case is different, in that he donated to a charitable foundation that also coincidentally employed many key Hillary Clinton campaign staffers and opeated as a slush fund. Lois Lerner of the IRS no doubt found nothing wrong with any of that.

Update: Even worse, it's now $75K that he cops to. See also further update below.

The last nail in the coffin of MSM credibility? Dylan Byers of Politico reports:

ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos has given $50,000 to the Clinton Foundation in recent years, charitable contributions that he did not publicly disclose while reporting on the Clintons or their non-profit organization, the On Media blog has learned.

In both 2013 and 2014, Stephanopoulos made a $25,000 donation to the 501 nonprofit founded by former president Bill Clinton, the Foundation's records show. Stephanopoulos never disclosed this information to viewers, even when interviewing author Peter Schweizer last month about his book "Clinton Cash," which alleges that donations to the Foundation may have influenced some of Hillary Clinton's actions as Secretary of State.

In a statement to the On Media blog on Thursday, Stephanopoulos apologized and said that he should have disclosed the donations to ABC News and its viewers.

Stephanopoulos should not have been allowed to conduct that interview, and his non-disclosure suggests that he is not worthy of trust by his employer or viewers. His attempt to justify the donation echoes the party line about the purportedly valuable “work” the Foundation does, by which people never mean funding private jet travel for the Clintons, or offering salaries to Hillary’s campaign staff in between campaigns.

 "I made charitable donations to the Foundation in support of the work they’re doing on global AIDS prevention and deforestation, causes I care about deeply," he said. "I thought that my contributions were a matter of public record. However, in hindsight, I should have taken the extra step of personally disclosing my donations to my employer and to the viewehttp://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/21/AR2011012106861.htmlrs on air during the recent news stories about the Foundation. I apologize."

It is time for him to resign, and if he does not, for ABC to fire him.

Update: Jerry Schmitt reminds us that Keith Olbermann left MSNBC after it came out that he had donated to three poiltical campaigns, violating an NBC policy.

Although neither the network nor Olbermann publicly cited a reason for his abrupt departure, the relationship ran into trouble in November when MSNBC suspended Olbermann for two days for making campaign contributions to three political candidates, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), who was severely wounded in a Jan. 8 shooting.

During the campaign-contribution flap, the network said it was acting under an NBC News policy that prohibits political contributions by its employees without prior approval. But Olbermann was publicly unapologetic about his behavior, expressing his disdain for MSNBC's decision when he returned to the air after his suspension - which was the culmination of several run-ins between Olbermann and MSNBC's president, Phil Griffin.

Technically, Stephanopoulos's case is different, in that he donated to a charitable foundation that also coincidentally employed many key Hillary Clinton campaign staffers and opeated as a slush fund. Lois Lerner of the IRS no doubt found nothing wrong with any of that.