U.N.: Yemen near 'total collapse'

All is well. Remain calm.

With the White Hous still insisting that Yemen is a "model" for its anti-terrorism policies, the U.N.'s human rights chief noted that the fighting was killing dozens of civilians and that the country was near "total collapse":

The UN said that since Friday, at least 93 civilians had been killed and 364 injured.

"The situation in Yemen is extremely alarming, with dozens of civilians killed over the past four days," UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said.

"The country seems to be on the verge of total collapse."

He denounced reported attacks by Huthi-linked fighters on three hospitals in Daleh that caused an unknown number of casualties.

A spokeswoman for European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said the conflict was having "terrible consequences" for civilians.

"We call on all parties to the conflict to ensure the protection of civilians, that civilian infrastructure is not directly targeted," the EU said.

The International Committee of the Red Cross said it was trying to negotiate the safe arrival of a plane stocked with medical supplies to treat up to 1,000 people.

"There are casualties across the country," said the ICRC's Cedric Schweizer.

Trading blame for the escalation, Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal charged that the Huthi rebels and their ally, Saleh, had "decided with the support of Iran to destabilise Yemen".

"We are not warmongers, but when they beat the drums of war we are ready," he said.

Tehran hit back, accusing Riyadh of jeopardising the entire Middle East.

"The fire of war in the region from any side... will drag the whole region to play with fire," said Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian.

Iranian state media rejected as "utter lies" claims Tehran had sent arms to Yemen, saying it had only dispatched non-military aid.

All those Arab states that were harshly criticizing the U.S. for civilian casualties in the Iraq War suddenly find the shoe on the other foot.  Schadenfreude is a beautiful thing.

The Houthis are better fighters than most realized.  They are hanging on grimly across the country and apparently advancing on Aden, a vital port city.  The wobbly coalition of forces taking on the rebels won't hold together forever, so the Saudis had better hope they can end this sooner rather than later.

All is well. Remain calm.

With the White Hous still insisting that Yemen is a "model" for its anti-terrorism policies, the U.N.'s human rights chief noted that the fighting was killing dozens of civilians and that the country was near "total collapse":

The UN said that since Friday, at least 93 civilians had been killed and 364 injured.

"The situation in Yemen is extremely alarming, with dozens of civilians killed over the past four days," UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said.

"The country seems to be on the verge of total collapse."

He denounced reported attacks by Huthi-linked fighters on three hospitals in Daleh that caused an unknown number of casualties.

A spokeswoman for European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said the conflict was having "terrible consequences" for civilians.

"We call on all parties to the conflict to ensure the protection of civilians, that civilian infrastructure is not directly targeted," the EU said.

The International Committee of the Red Cross said it was trying to negotiate the safe arrival of a plane stocked with medical supplies to treat up to 1,000 people.

"There are casualties across the country," said the ICRC's Cedric Schweizer.

Trading blame for the escalation, Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal charged that the Huthi rebels and their ally, Saleh, had "decided with the support of Iran to destabilise Yemen".

"We are not warmongers, but when they beat the drums of war we are ready," he said.

Tehran hit back, accusing Riyadh of jeopardising the entire Middle East.

"The fire of war in the region from any side... will drag the whole region to play with fire," said Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian.

Iranian state media rejected as "utter lies" claims Tehran had sent arms to Yemen, saying it had only dispatched non-military aid.

All those Arab states that were harshly criticizing the U.S. for civilian casualties in the Iraq War suddenly find the shoe on the other foot.  Schadenfreude is a beautiful thing.

The Houthis are better fighters than most realized.  They are hanging on grimly across the country and apparently advancing on Aden, a vital port city.  The wobbly coalition of forces taking on the rebels won't hold together forever, so the Saudis had better hope they can end this sooner rather than later.