Texas set to pass open carry law

The heads of gun grabbers across America are ready to explode as Texas seems certain to pass an open carry bill.

Washington Times:

Texas is currently one of six states, including California, New York and Florida, that bars citizens from openly carrying handguns. But Texans can carry long guns in public, which has prompted gun-rights activists to carry assault rifles into restaurants and stores to highlight what they consider a senseless legal distinction.

Gun-rights groups are also pushing for legislation to allow some students and university employees to carry concealed handguns on college campuses. The state Senate passed a campus-carry measure last month and the House is expected to pass a similar measure. Mr. Abbott also supports the campus-carry idea.

That law would make Texas one of only eight states with campus-carry laws permitting guns on college campuses.

“We are seeing historic progress in Texas,” Terry Holcomb Sr., executive director of Texas Carry, a gun-rights group told The Wall Street Journal. He noted that open-carry legislation had never even made it out of a Texas legislative committee before this year.

What has changed? The perception that the federal government is looking to tear up the Second Amendment is having the effect of forcing gun rights supporters to make that notion impossible. It doesn't matter if that perception is correct. What matters is that people are worried about a president who has constantly tried to expand his power through executive orders attacking their rights. Allowing open carry sends a powerful message that the more the government tries to take away people's Second Amendment rights, the more the people will push back.

In your face, gun grabbers.

 



 

The heads of gun grabbers across America are ready to explode as Texas seems certain to pass an open carry bill.

Washington Times:

Texas is currently one of six states, including California, New York and Florida, that bars citizens from openly carrying handguns. But Texans can carry long guns in public, which has prompted gun-rights activists to carry assault rifles into restaurants and stores to highlight what they consider a senseless legal distinction.

Gun-rights groups are also pushing for legislation to allow some students and university employees to carry concealed handguns on college campuses. The state Senate passed a campus-carry measure last month and the House is expected to pass a similar measure. Mr. Abbott also supports the campus-carry idea.

That law would make Texas one of only eight states with campus-carry laws permitting guns on college campuses.

“We are seeing historic progress in Texas,” Terry Holcomb Sr., executive director of Texas Carry, a gun-rights group told The Wall Street Journal. He noted that open-carry legislation had never even made it out of a Texas legislative committee before this year.

What has changed? The perception that the federal government is looking to tear up the Second Amendment is having the effect of forcing gun rights supporters to make that notion impossible. It doesn't matter if that perception is correct. What matters is that people are worried about a president who has constantly tried to expand his power through executive orders attacking their rights. Allowing open carry sends a powerful message that the more the government tries to take away people's Second Amendment rights, the more the people will push back.

In your face, gun grabbers.