Obama criticizes 'less than loving Christians' at Easter prayer breakfast

As the Washington Times points out, the latest Obama signal of religious relativism came after his administration had issued a statement on the Kenyan massacre at a Christian college without once mentioning the religion of the victims – or the attackers.

Addressing an ecumenical gathering at the White House of cardinals, ministers, pastors and the lay faithful, Mr. Obama was talking about the Apostle John’s call to love “with actions and in truth” rather than with words. The president then briefly gave in to temptation, and deviated from his prepared remarks.

“On Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I am supposed to love,” Mr. Obama said. “And I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less-than-loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned. But that’s a topic for another day.”

The audience in the East Room murmured, some with apparent disapproval, as others laughed. The president did not elaborate on what he meant, and returned to his address.

“I was about to veer off,” Mr. Obama told the crowd. “I’m pulling it back.”

The president’s zinging of Christians came four days after he sanitized any reference to religion in the terrorist attacks at a college in Kenya that left 147 dead and scores wounded. Witnesses said the extremists, reportedly belonging to the Islamist terrorist group al-Shabbab, targeted Christians for death by asking hostages if they were familiar with passages from the Koran.

Mr. Obama’s official statement on the attacks described “terrorist atrocities” and “innocent men and women,” but never mentioned religion. His spokesman did say that Christians “reportedly” were targeted.

Bill Donohue, president of the Catholic League, called Mr. Obama’s comments at the prayer breakfast “very disturbing.”

“This comes right on the heels of Muslim madmen singling out Christians, calling them out by name, knowing which ones they wanted to execute, in Kenya,” Mr. Donohue said in an interview. “We have a president who never mentions the word ‘Christians’ except when he wants to denigrate them.”

It wasn’t clear whether Mr. Obama was referring to “expressions” directed at him personally, or other examples in the public arena. In the past week, the White House has been highly critical of efforts in Indiana and Arkansas to enact religious freedom laws, saying the measures discriminate against gays.

When a reporter asked White House press secretary Josh Earnest if he knew what Mr. Obama was referring to as “less-than-loving expressions,” Mr. Earnest replied simply, “I don’t.”

Of course it's un-Christian to criticize the president – un-American, too.  But it's apparent the president doesn't follow Twitter very closely.  If he did, he would know that most of the hate and "un-Christian" sentiments were coming from his left-wing allies and directed toward people of faith. 

The reason for the Christian-bashing is obvious:

“He doesn’t want to offend Muslims,” Mr. Donohue said. “But he obviously doesn’t mind offending Christians. Somehow it’s okay to speak about Christians disappointing him, because they don’t always act with love. Well, that’s true. But what a grand opportunity to make a statement about what happened last week in Kenya. And once again, he’s silent with Christians when it comes to us being the victims of genocide. But when it comes to a cheap remark like this, he doesn’t pass up an opportunity.”

The president's perversity – a perversity echoed by many on the left – wouldn't be so bad if he bashed Muslims for committing far worse sins in the name of their faith.  Calling someone names is not the same as cutting off his head to glorify Allah.  Until Obama acknowledges the difference, his criticism of Christianity will be seen as gratuitous slaps to mollify Muslims, and not serious commentary.

As the Washington Times points out, the latest Obama signal of religious relativism came after his administration had issued a statement on the Kenyan massacre at a Christian college without once mentioning the religion of the victims – or the attackers.

Addressing an ecumenical gathering at the White House of cardinals, ministers, pastors and the lay faithful, Mr. Obama was talking about the Apostle John’s call to love “with actions and in truth” rather than with words. The president then briefly gave in to temptation, and deviated from his prepared remarks.

“On Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I am supposed to love,” Mr. Obama said. “And I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less-than-loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned. But that’s a topic for another day.”

The audience in the East Room murmured, some with apparent disapproval, as others laughed. The president did not elaborate on what he meant, and returned to his address.

“I was about to veer off,” Mr. Obama told the crowd. “I’m pulling it back.”

The president’s zinging of Christians came four days after he sanitized any reference to religion in the terrorist attacks at a college in Kenya that left 147 dead and scores wounded. Witnesses said the extremists, reportedly belonging to the Islamist terrorist group al-Shabbab, targeted Christians for death by asking hostages if they were familiar with passages from the Koran.

Mr. Obama’s official statement on the attacks described “terrorist atrocities” and “innocent men and women,” but never mentioned religion. His spokesman did say that Christians “reportedly” were targeted.

Bill Donohue, president of the Catholic League, called Mr. Obama’s comments at the prayer breakfast “very disturbing.”

“This comes right on the heels of Muslim madmen singling out Christians, calling them out by name, knowing which ones they wanted to execute, in Kenya,” Mr. Donohue said in an interview. “We have a president who never mentions the word ‘Christians’ except when he wants to denigrate them.”

It wasn’t clear whether Mr. Obama was referring to “expressions” directed at him personally, or other examples in the public arena. In the past week, the White House has been highly critical of efforts in Indiana and Arkansas to enact religious freedom laws, saying the measures discriminate against gays.

When a reporter asked White House press secretary Josh Earnest if he knew what Mr. Obama was referring to as “less-than-loving expressions,” Mr. Earnest replied simply, “I don’t.”

Of course it's un-Christian to criticize the president – un-American, too.  But it's apparent the president doesn't follow Twitter very closely.  If he did, he would know that most of the hate and "un-Christian" sentiments were coming from his left-wing allies and directed toward people of faith. 

The reason for the Christian-bashing is obvious:

“He doesn’t want to offend Muslims,” Mr. Donohue said. “But he obviously doesn’t mind offending Christians. Somehow it’s okay to speak about Christians disappointing him, because they don’t always act with love. Well, that’s true. But what a grand opportunity to make a statement about what happened last week in Kenya. And once again, he’s silent with Christians when it comes to us being the victims of genocide. But when it comes to a cheap remark like this, he doesn’t pass up an opportunity.”

The president's perversity – a perversity echoed by many on the left – wouldn't be so bad if he bashed Muslims for committing far worse sins in the name of their faith.  Calling someone names is not the same as cutting off his head to glorify Allah.  Until Obama acknowledges the difference, his criticism of Christianity will be seen as gratuitous slaps to mollify Muslims, and not serious commentary.