Hillary's poll numbers tanking as e-mail scandal takes a toll

Andrew Malcolm at Investor's Business Daily points out that some key state polls show that Hillary Clinton is losing support fast and that the e-mail scandal is playing a bigger role than first thought.

According to the newest numbers, Hillary Clinton is now running three points behind Jeb Bush in the key swing state of Florida. And her lead over Marco Rubio there has collapsed from ten points to but two points.

Of course, none of those people have yet to announce their candidacy. Everyone is pretending they don't know that she will announce later this month, Rubio likely in about two weeks and Bush after he rakes in a few dozen million more donation dollars.

The new Quinnipiac University Poll finds Clinton leads Rand Paul in Ohio, but only by five points, 46%-41%. In Pennsylvania, Paul has slipped ahead of her by one point, 45%-44%. Quinnipiac focuses on Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania because in the last 55 years no one has won the White House without winning at least two of the three.

Clinton leads other potential GOP candidates, and she still has the underground support of mainstream media. But her leads have, in fact, melted. In January, we noted here that her massive margins over all potential Republican opponents was beginning to crumble. That continues.

None of this at present threatens her glide to the Democrat nomination in Philadelphia 15 months from now, though it will cost her vital campaign and debate practice against viable opponents. Ex-Gov. Martin O'Malley now has the full support of ex-Gov. Martin O'Malley to challenge her and Chief Elizabeth Warren says she's not running.

Not at least until the big money folks in New York and LA hit the "Abandon Ship" signal come fall if Hillary's numbers continue to crater.

Clinton has yet to put forth a broad rationale for her becoming commander-in-chief beyond gender. But her support remains strong among women, ranging from seven points to 28 points. Among men, not so much; her largest lead is three points versus a 23-point negative deficit.

Once she announces, those numbers may fall even farther.  Right now, Hillary is benefiting from the fact that the idea of her candidacy is exciting women, but once she makes a formal announcement, the reality of her campaign will hit home, and people will start asking questions about why she's running and what specifically she wants to accomplish.  If she can't come up with anything better than she should be elected so that she can become the first female president, at least some of that female support is likely to melt away.

All this points to more pressure being placed on Elizabeth Warren to run.  Warren has plenty of ideas – most of which are not supported beyond the liberal base.  But we should probably take her at her word that she won't run as long as Clinton is in the race. 

But if Hillary's numbers keep heading south, anything can happen.

Andrew Malcolm at Investor's Business Daily points out that some key state polls show that Hillary Clinton is losing support fast and that the e-mail scandal is playing a bigger role than first thought.

According to the newest numbers, Hillary Clinton is now running three points behind Jeb Bush in the key swing state of Florida. And her lead over Marco Rubio there has collapsed from ten points to but two points.

Of course, none of those people have yet to announce their candidacy. Everyone is pretending they don't know that she will announce later this month, Rubio likely in about two weeks and Bush after he rakes in a few dozen million more donation dollars.

The new Quinnipiac University Poll finds Clinton leads Rand Paul in Ohio, but only by five points, 46%-41%. In Pennsylvania, Paul has slipped ahead of her by one point, 45%-44%. Quinnipiac focuses on Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania because in the last 55 years no one has won the White House without winning at least two of the three.

Clinton leads other potential GOP candidates, and she still has the underground support of mainstream media. But her leads have, in fact, melted. In January, we noted here that her massive margins over all potential Republican opponents was beginning to crumble. That continues.

None of this at present threatens her glide to the Democrat nomination in Philadelphia 15 months from now, though it will cost her vital campaign and debate practice against viable opponents. Ex-Gov. Martin O'Malley now has the full support of ex-Gov. Martin O'Malley to challenge her and Chief Elizabeth Warren says she's not running.

Not at least until the big money folks in New York and LA hit the "Abandon Ship" signal come fall if Hillary's numbers continue to crater.

Clinton has yet to put forth a broad rationale for her becoming commander-in-chief beyond gender. But her support remains strong among women, ranging from seven points to 28 points. Among men, not so much; her largest lead is three points versus a 23-point negative deficit.

Once she announces, those numbers may fall even farther.  Right now, Hillary is benefiting from the fact that the idea of her candidacy is exciting women, but once she makes a formal announcement, the reality of her campaign will hit home, and people will start asking questions about why she's running and what specifically she wants to accomplish.  If she can't come up with anything better than she should be elected so that she can become the first female president, at least some of that female support is likely to melt away.

All this points to more pressure being placed on Elizabeth Warren to run.  Warren has plenty of ideas – most of which are not supported beyond the liberal base.  But we should probably take her at her word that she won't run as long as Clinton is in the race. 

But if Hillary's numbers keep heading south, anything can happen.