Get ready for another surge of unaccompanied minors cross the border

The "Border Surge, Part II" has begun in earnest as the government is reporting that thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America are once again jumping the border.

The administration claims to be ready for them this time. But rather than be well prepared, why not work to stop them before they cross rather than encouraging the exodus from Honduras, Nicaragua, and other Central American countriies?

The Hill:

Migration analysts project that almost 40,000 unaccompanied children will try to cross into the United States from Mexico this year, down almost 45 percent from 2014.

That’s still likely to be one of the highest surges on record, however, and is expected to strain border personnel and potentially force Congress to return to the issue when it considers funding for the government.

It could also trigger another political fight over the thorny issues of border security and immigration reform, particularly as the 2016 presidential contest heats up over the summer.

Administration officials, who were caught off guard during last year's surge, say they've taken lessons from the experience and are much better prepared this year. But border state lawmakers and child welfare advocates, while pleased with the lower projections, are also concerned that policymakers – both in the White House and on Capitol Hill – aren't doing nearly enough to address the issue.

“We're doing a lot better [but] we still need to be doing more,” Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat from a border district, said Friday by phone. “When you drill down to actual numbers, you're still talking about thousands of kids. … It's almost as if they're trying to downplay it, the administration.” 

Kevin Appleby, director of migration policy at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, was also critical of the administration's commitment.

He said the lower projections largely reflect the White House’s effort to get Mexico and other Central American governments to block unaccompanied children before they reach the U.S. border. That’s to the detriment of children who might be eligible for U.S. asylum but are instead returned to dangerous conditions back home.

“The fact that the numbers are lower is not because the administration has had an effective PR campaign or conditions in those countries have improved. We've exported the enforcement,” Appleby said Friday. “They're pulling kids off the trains; they're stopping them at the Mexico-Guatemala border. … So there's still a violation of international law there.”

While Central American governments are blocking a few kids from coming, the Obama administration is actually flying kids into the US from their countries.

Once the kids are here, the government works to bring their parent here as well. That turns that 40,000 human wave into a 120,000 tsunami. And that doesn't include other brothers and sisters of the illegal alien minor children who manage to cross the border being brought along by their parents.

Even Democrats recognize the folly of this policy. But with the rest of the world saying that it's "inhumane" to turn away illegal aliens at the border, our ludicrous policies aren't likely to change anytime soon.

 

 

 

The "Border Surge, Part II" has begun in earnest as the government is reporting that thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America are once again jumping the border.

The administration claims to be ready for them this time. But rather than be well prepared, why not work to stop them before they cross rather than encouraging the exodus from Honduras, Nicaragua, and other Central American countriies?

The Hill:

Migration analysts project that almost 40,000 unaccompanied children will try to cross into the United States from Mexico this year, down almost 45 percent from 2014.

That’s still likely to be one of the highest surges on record, however, and is expected to strain border personnel and potentially force Congress to return to the issue when it considers funding for the government.

It could also trigger another political fight over the thorny issues of border security and immigration reform, particularly as the 2016 presidential contest heats up over the summer.

Administration officials, who were caught off guard during last year's surge, say they've taken lessons from the experience and are much better prepared this year. But border state lawmakers and child welfare advocates, while pleased with the lower projections, are also concerned that policymakers – both in the White House and on Capitol Hill – aren't doing nearly enough to address the issue.

“We're doing a lot better [but] we still need to be doing more,” Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat from a border district, said Friday by phone. “When you drill down to actual numbers, you're still talking about thousands of kids. … It's almost as if they're trying to downplay it, the administration.” 

Kevin Appleby, director of migration policy at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, was also critical of the administration's commitment.

He said the lower projections largely reflect the White House’s effort to get Mexico and other Central American governments to block unaccompanied children before they reach the U.S. border. That’s to the detriment of children who might be eligible for U.S. asylum but are instead returned to dangerous conditions back home.

“The fact that the numbers are lower is not because the administration has had an effective PR campaign or conditions in those countries have improved. We've exported the enforcement,” Appleby said Friday. “They're pulling kids off the trains; they're stopping them at the Mexico-Guatemala border. … So there's still a violation of international law there.”

While Central American governments are blocking a few kids from coming, the Obama administration is actually flying kids into the US from their countries.

Once the kids are here, the government works to bring their parent here as well. That turns that 40,000 human wave into a 120,000 tsunami. And that doesn't include other brothers and sisters of the illegal alien minor children who manage to cross the border being brought along by their parents.

Even Democrats recognize the folly of this policy. But with the rest of the world saying that it's "inhumane" to turn away illegal aliens at the border, our ludicrous policies aren't likely to change anytime soon.