Bloomberg falls for fake Nancy Reagan 'endorses' Hillary story

You don't get much more "mainstream" in the media than Bloomberg News and it's hard to be more embarassed if you're a dues paying member of the MSM to run a fake story from a fake website.

That's what happened to the august business/politics publication yesterday, when they ran a story ostensibly quoting Nancy Reagan as endorsing Hillary Clinton for president.

Politico:

Bloomberg Politics published a report about Nancy Reagan based off of fake news site NationalReport.net

The piece, headlined "Nancy Reagan gives her endorsement to... Hillary Clinton," quoted a supposed "Drudge Report" saying that the former first lady told the History Channel series "First Ladies In Their Own Words" that it's time for a female president. 

"For the GOP, this is slightly awkward. Since Ronald Reagan's presidency, and especially since his death, the Gipper's legacy has been worshipfully celebrated, often claimed, by Republican candidates," the article stated.

The problem is: Reagan never said such a thing and the series was actually on C-SPAN, not The History Channel. The report seems to have come from NationalReport.net, a spoof news site that has tricked many a politician and news organization in the past. The piece was then posted to a website called DrudgeReport.com.co, which doesn't seem to be connected to the actual Drudge Report. 

The piece, which was published just before 5 p.m. on Friday, was deleted within minutes.

We've reached out to a Bloomberg spokesperson for comment and will update here accordingly. 

Bloomberg later published an apology, saying "This story has been retracted. We fell for a hoax. Apologies." Executive Editor Mark Nizza tweeted, "very very stupid mistake, and one we take very seriously. Simple as that."

Yes, we at AT have very occassionally been bitten by the fake story bug. It's inevitable given the time pressures in publishing a daily journal of opinion.

But I can tell you as an editor that we catch most of these stories before publication. And we do it without an army of fact checkers and copy editors that publications like Bloomberg employ. Basically, it's a question of sources. Over the nearly 10 years this publication has been in business, we have learned the hard way which sources and writers we can trust and the few we can't. It's not complicated, nor is it even very hard work. It's simply a matter of being thorough - something that Boomberg failed miserably at doing in this case.

A "stupid mistake," indeed.

You don't get much more "mainstream" in the media than Bloomberg News and it's hard to be more embarassed if you're a dues paying member of the MSM to run a fake story from a fake website.

That's what happened to the august business/politics publication yesterday, when they ran a story ostensibly quoting Nancy Reagan as endorsing Hillary Clinton for president.

Politico:

Bloomberg Politics published a report about Nancy Reagan based off of fake news site NationalReport.net

The piece, headlined "Nancy Reagan gives her endorsement to... Hillary Clinton," quoted a supposed "Drudge Report" saying that the former first lady told the History Channel series "First Ladies In Their Own Words" that it's time for a female president. 

"For the GOP, this is slightly awkward. Since Ronald Reagan's presidency, and especially since his death, the Gipper's legacy has been worshipfully celebrated, often claimed, by Republican candidates," the article stated.

The problem is: Reagan never said such a thing and the series was actually on C-SPAN, not The History Channel. The report seems to have come from NationalReport.net, a spoof news site that has tricked many a politician and news organization in the past. The piece was then posted to a website called DrudgeReport.com.co, which doesn't seem to be connected to the actual Drudge Report. 

The piece, which was published just before 5 p.m. on Friday, was deleted within minutes.

We've reached out to a Bloomberg spokesperson for comment and will update here accordingly. 

Bloomberg later published an apology, saying "This story has been retracted. We fell for a hoax. Apologies." Executive Editor Mark Nizza tweeted, "very very stupid mistake, and one we take very seriously. Simple as that."

Yes, we at AT have very occassionally been bitten by the fake story bug. It's inevitable given the time pressures in publishing a daily journal of opinion.

But I can tell you as an editor that we catch most of these stories before publication. And we do it without an army of fact checkers and copy editors that publications like Bloomberg employ. Basically, it's a question of sources. Over the nearly 10 years this publication has been in business, we have learned the hard way which sources and writers we can trust and the few we can't. It's not complicated, nor is it even very hard work. It's simply a matter of being thorough - something that Boomberg failed miserably at doing in this case.

A "stupid mistake," indeed.