Bizarre Clinton Foundation attempt to limit damage from accepting donations from foreign governments

The spectacle of foreign governments donating to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation is damaging Hillary Clinton’s credibility as a presidential candidate.  Hillary may have “resigned” from the board (are they formally changing the name to remove her?  Is it now the Bill and Chelsea Clinton Foundation?), but that is not enough to quell the worries, apparently. The Wall Street Journal reports:

 The board of the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation has decided to continue accepting donations from foreign governments, primarily from six countries, even though Hillary Clinton is running for president, a summary of the new policy to be released Thursday shows.

The rules would permit donations from Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the U.K.—countries that support or have supported Clinton Foundation programs on health, poverty and climate change, according to the summary.

That means other nations would be prohibited from making large donations to the foundation. But those governments would be allowed to participate in the Clinton Global Initiative, a subsidiary of the foundation where companies, nonprofit groups and government officials work on solutions to global problems.

Why these countries and not, for instance, Japan?  These six countries are all primarily Caucasian.  Is the Clinton Foundation racist?

And of course, when it comes right down to it, anybody can donate to the Clinton Global Initiative, which keeps the money in the same corporate umbrella.  As Steven Hayward of Powerline put it, “Look, I can understand that the Clinton Foundation needs to make its bloated payroll, and Goldman Sachs can only cough up so much.”  Keep in mind that Chelsea Clinton works for the Foundation, and keeping up a ten-million-dollar apartment in Manhattan isn’t cheap.

In the end, the Foundation is telling other countries than the Mgic Six that they are second-class donors.  They have to come in through the service entrance.

It is bizarre.

The spectacle of foreign governments donating to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation is damaging Hillary Clinton’s credibility as a presidential candidate.  Hillary may have “resigned” from the board (are they formally changing the name to remove her?  Is it now the Bill and Chelsea Clinton Foundation?), but that is not enough to quell the worries, apparently. The Wall Street Journal reports:

 The board of the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation has decided to continue accepting donations from foreign governments, primarily from six countries, even though Hillary Clinton is running for president, a summary of the new policy to be released Thursday shows.

The rules would permit donations from Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the U.K.—countries that support or have supported Clinton Foundation programs on health, poverty and climate change, according to the summary.

That means other nations would be prohibited from making large donations to the foundation. But those governments would be allowed to participate in the Clinton Global Initiative, a subsidiary of the foundation where companies, nonprofit groups and government officials work on solutions to global problems.

Why these countries and not, for instance, Japan?  These six countries are all primarily Caucasian.  Is the Clinton Foundation racist?

And of course, when it comes right down to it, anybody can donate to the Clinton Global Initiative, which keeps the money in the same corporate umbrella.  As Steven Hayward of Powerline put it, “Look, I can understand that the Clinton Foundation needs to make its bloated payroll, and Goldman Sachs can only cough up so much.”  Keep in mind that Chelsea Clinton works for the Foundation, and keeping up a ten-million-dollar apartment in Manhattan isn’t cheap.

In the end, the Foundation is telling other countries than the Mgic Six that they are second-class donors.  They have to come in through the service entrance.

It is bizarre.