We now have the poster child for the government-union pension racket

When it comes to handing out pension benefits to government employees, nobody outdoes the Great State of Illinois, whose unfunded pension liabilities hit $187 billion two years ago (the latest data) and are still rising.  And when it comes to screwing the taxpayers who will have to dig deeper and deeper to pay off the promises handed out to union members, nobody outdoes  65 year old David Piccioli.

Ray Long of the Chicago Tribune explains:

A union lobbyist who qualified for a teacher pension windfall by subbing at a school for one day is now suing a state retirement board because his benefits were scaled back once his sweet deal was exposed.

Retired Illinois Federation of Teachers lobbyist David Piccioli, 65, is arguing that lawmakers violated the state constitutional provision that says a pension cannot be "diminished or impaired" once it is set.

Piccioli is already collecting $31,485 from the Teachers Retirement System. If he wins his case, his teacher pension could increase by more than $36,000, the Tribune estimated — more than doubling what he gets now.

Piccioli also gets a second state pension worth just over $30,000 that covers time he served as a legislative aide. Both pensions are based on an average of his six-figure salaries as a union lobbyist.

So for his magnificent public service, lobbying legislators for a union (in part to obligate taxpayers to pay their pensions come hell or high water), serving as a factotum in the legislature, and serving one whole day as a substitute teacher, Picccioli stands to collect just under a hundred Gs, with taxpayers on the hook to pay everything the depleted pension funds can’t cover. His Social Security checks will be in addition to that.

A 36 grand pension for one day of work? What could better embody the corruption of the unions recycling mandatory membership dues into political cash to support Democrats who vote for outrageous union benefits taken from taxpayers at the point of a gun?

Let’s give Piccioli the fame to which he is entitled, along with all that money.

When it comes to handing out pension benefits to government employees, nobody outdoes the Great State of Illinois, whose unfunded pension liabilities hit $187 billion two years ago (the latest data) and are still rising.  And when it comes to screwing the taxpayers who will have to dig deeper and deeper to pay off the promises handed out to union members, nobody outdoes  65 year old David Piccioli.

Ray Long of the Chicago Tribune explains:

A union lobbyist who qualified for a teacher pension windfall by subbing at a school for one day is now suing a state retirement board because his benefits were scaled back once his sweet deal was exposed.

Retired Illinois Federation of Teachers lobbyist David Piccioli, 65, is arguing that lawmakers violated the state constitutional provision that says a pension cannot be "diminished or impaired" once it is set.

Piccioli is already collecting $31,485 from the Teachers Retirement System. If he wins his case, his teacher pension could increase by more than $36,000, the Tribune estimated — more than doubling what he gets now.

Piccioli also gets a second state pension worth just over $30,000 that covers time he served as a legislative aide. Both pensions are based on an average of his six-figure salaries as a union lobbyist.

So for his magnificent public service, lobbying legislators for a union (in part to obligate taxpayers to pay their pensions come hell or high water), serving as a factotum in the legislature, and serving one whole day as a substitute teacher, Picccioli stands to collect just under a hundred Gs, with taxpayers on the hook to pay everything the depleted pension funds can’t cover. His Social Security checks will be in addition to that.

A 36 grand pension for one day of work? What could better embody the corruption of the unions recycling mandatory membership dues into political cash to support Democrats who vote for outrageous union benefits taken from taxpayers at the point of a gun?

Let’s give Piccioli the fame to which he is entitled, along with all that money.