The slandering of Scott Walker continues apace while Hillary gets a pass for doing far worse

The New York Times mocks Scott Walker on the front page of Saturday’s edition. The paper “accuses” Scott Walker of toning down his Wisconsin persona to suit whatever particular audience he happens to face. The horror!

The column’s title shows the snark: “For 2016 Run, Scott Walker Washes ‘Wiscahnsin’ Out of His Mouth” and goes on to moc --  the Midwesterner (and all people in flyover territory):

Out on the presidential campaign trail, Gov. Scott Walker has left “Wiscahnsin” back home in Wisconsin. He now wants to strengthen the economy, not the “ecahnahmy.” And while he once had the “ahnor” of meeting fellow Republicans, he told one group here this week that he simply enjoyed “talkin’ with y’all.”

The classic Upper Midwest accent — nasal and full of flat a’s — is one of several Walker trademarks to have fallen away this month after an intense period of strategizing and coaching designed to help Mr. Walker capitalize on his popularity in early polls and show that he is not some provincial politician out of his depth.

Some “provincial politician”? Was Abraham Lincoln a “provincial politician”? Robert La Follette -- also from Wisconsin and hailed as one of the most “progressive” politician in American history (though a Republican). . How about George McGovern from South Dakota? Was he , too, provincial? Frank Church (Idaho), who so damaged the CIA and was lionized for doing so, also provincial? One could go on and on regarding how impactful people from provincial states have been throughout American history. But in the view of the New York Times and elites such as Barack Obama (bitter clingers), the only people who matter are from the East and West coasts. Beyond the slam on Walker’s classic Upper Midwest accent being modulated one can ask: did the New York Times ever even bother to report Hillary Clinton’s faux Dixie accent when she spoke before a group of Southerners. Here is a clip:

 

 

As Bill O’Reilly said Senator traveled down South as did her accent.

Did the New York Times criticize Hillary Clinton for her over-the-top faux southern accent? No record of that happening. Because it did not.

As Lauri Regan points out, the biggest abuser of faux accents is Obama. There's a lot if you google it but here's a few:

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2010/01/code_black.html

http://nation.foxnews.com/barack-obama/2012/10/02/daily-caller-uncovers-stunning-new-obama-tape

http://dialectblog.com/2011/05/11/thoughts-on-obamas-accent/

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1936743

and as Charles Krauthammer pointed out recently, John "Jenjis Kahn" Kerry adopted a faux Boston Brahmin accent as a young anti-war protestor.

The New York Times mocks Scott Walker on the front page of Saturday’s edition. The paper “accuses” Scott Walker of toning down his Wisconsin persona to suit whatever particular audience he happens to face. The horror!

The column’s title shows the snark: “For 2016 Run, Scott Walker Washes ‘Wiscahnsin’ Out of His Mouth” and goes on to moc --  the Midwesterner (and all people in flyover territory):

Out on the presidential campaign trail, Gov. Scott Walker has left “Wiscahnsin” back home in Wisconsin. He now wants to strengthen the economy, not the “ecahnahmy.” And while he once had the “ahnor” of meeting fellow Republicans, he told one group here this week that he simply enjoyed “talkin’ with y’all.”

The classic Upper Midwest accent — nasal and full of flat a’s — is one of several Walker trademarks to have fallen away this month after an intense period of strategizing and coaching designed to help Mr. Walker capitalize on his popularity in early polls and show that he is not some provincial politician out of his depth.

Some “provincial politician”? Was Abraham Lincoln a “provincial politician”? Robert La Follette -- also from Wisconsin and hailed as one of the most “progressive” politician in American history (though a Republican). . How about George McGovern from South Dakota? Was he , too, provincial? Frank Church (Idaho), who so damaged the CIA and was lionized for doing so, also provincial? One could go on and on regarding how impactful people from provincial states have been throughout American history. But in the view of the New York Times and elites such as Barack Obama (bitter clingers), the only people who matter are from the East and West coasts. Beyond the slam on Walker’s classic Upper Midwest accent being modulated one can ask: did the New York Times ever even bother to report Hillary Clinton’s faux Dixie accent when she spoke before a group of Southerners. Here is a clip:

 

 

As Bill O’Reilly said Senator traveled down South as did her accent.

Did the New York Times criticize Hillary Clinton for her over-the-top faux southern accent? No record of that happening. Because it did not.

As Lauri Regan points out, the biggest abuser of faux accents is Obama. There's a lot if you google it but here's a few:

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2010/01/code_black.html

http://nation.foxnews.com/barack-obama/2012/10/02/daily-caller-uncovers-stunning-new-obama-tape

http://dialectblog.com/2011/05/11/thoughts-on-obamas-accent/

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1936743

and as Charles Krauthammer pointed out recently, John "Jenjis Kahn" Kerry adopted a faux Boston Brahmin accent as a young anti-war protestor.