Concerns about Clinton private emails expressed early on

Aides to former President Bill Clinton expressed concern as far back as 2009 that adding Hillary Clinton's email account to the private server in their Long Island home would be an invitation for hackers, according to a story in the Wall Street Journal:

A private server had obvious advantages. It would give Mrs. Clinton more control over her email, people familiar with her team’s reasoning said. Privately, aides of the former president worried that adding her account would make the system a target for hackers. They also weren’t aware she would use it for all her official correspondence.

That decision has now invited the kind of relentless public scrutiny it was designed to avoid, while also maximizing Mrs. Clinton’s control over sensitive email correspondence that she might not want to get out.

In addition, though Mrs. Clinton plans to run a 2016 presidential campaign focused on the future, the email furor has evoked bitter controversies from her past, in particular the notion that she is overly secretive in her dealings.

Mrs. Clinton didn’t appear to violate any laws in choosing to use private email, but she did run afoul of long-standing guidelines over the use of private email and likely prevented official records from being entered into the public record in a timely fashion.

Republicans from several committees, including the Select Committee on Benghazi, want to examine the 32,000 emails that Hillary says she may have destroyed. Access to that private server is vital if any documents are to be retrieved. It may be possible to restore at least some of the emails if a forensic analysis of the server can be undertaken.

It seems clear that Clinton will fight any effort to do that. The Republicans will probably have to go to court to get them - a longshot given the privacy issues involved and lack of evidence that any crime was committed. But we are only at the beginning of this probe and it's possible emails will surface from other sources that would suggest other avenues of investigation.

If Hillary thought that press conference would tamp down the controversy, she was deluding herself.

Aides to former President Bill Clinton expressed concern as far back as 2009 that adding Hillary Clinton's email account to the private server in their Long Island home would be an invitation for hackers, according to a story in the Wall Street Journal:

A private server had obvious advantages. It would give Mrs. Clinton more control over her email, people familiar with her team’s reasoning said. Privately, aides of the former president worried that adding her account would make the system a target for hackers. They also weren’t aware she would use it for all her official correspondence.

That decision has now invited the kind of relentless public scrutiny it was designed to avoid, while also maximizing Mrs. Clinton’s control over sensitive email correspondence that she might not want to get out.

In addition, though Mrs. Clinton plans to run a 2016 presidential campaign focused on the future, the email furor has evoked bitter controversies from her past, in particular the notion that she is overly secretive in her dealings.

Mrs. Clinton didn’t appear to violate any laws in choosing to use private email, but she did run afoul of long-standing guidelines over the use of private email and likely prevented official records from being entered into the public record in a timely fashion.

Republicans from several committees, including the Select Committee on Benghazi, want to examine the 32,000 emails that Hillary says she may have destroyed. Access to that private server is vital if any documents are to be retrieved. It may be possible to restore at least some of the emails if a forensic analysis of the server can be undertaken.

It seems clear that Clinton will fight any effort to do that. The Republicans will probably have to go to court to get them - a longshot given the privacy issues involved and lack of evidence that any crime was committed. But we are only at the beginning of this probe and it's possible emails will surface from other sources that would suggest other avenues of investigation.

If Hillary thought that press conference would tamp down the controversy, she was deluding herself.