Japanese hostage executed by Islamic State

A Japanese hostage held by Islamic State was the subject of tense negotiations among Japan, IS, and Jordan over the last 3 days, as IS demanded the release of an Iraqi female terrorist held by Jordan in exchange of the Japanese hostage, Kenji Goto, and a Jordanian air force pilot.

But Jordan refused to release the terrorist until they had proof of life and a guarantee that the hostages would be released. This, Islamic State would not do and late yesterday afternoon, a video appeared on the internet from a media source often used by Islamic State, showing the headless body of Goto.

Fox News:

"I feel indignation over this immoral and heinous act of terrorism," Abe told reporters after convening an emergency Cabinet meeting.

"When I think of the grief of his family, I am left speechless," he said. "We are filled with deep regret."

Japan ordered heightened security precautions Sunday and said it would persist with its non-military support for fighting terrorism.

Threats from ISIS prompted an order for tighter security at airports and at Japanese facilities overseas, such as embassies and schools, government spokesman Yoshihide Suga said.

He said it would be "inappropriate" to comment on the status of the Jordanian pilot.

The failure to save Goto raised fears for the life of the pilot, Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, also held by the militant group that controls about a third of both Syria and Iraq. Unlike some earlier messages delivered in the crisis, the video that circulated online late Saturday purporting to show a militant beheading Goto did not mention the pilot.

Jordan renewed an offer Sunday to swap an Al Qaeda prisoner for al-Kaseasbeh, who was seized after his F-16 crashed near ISIS' de facto capital, Raqqa, Syria, in December.

Government spokesman Mohammed al-Momani told The Associated Press that "we are still ready to hand over" Sajida al-Rishawi, who faces death by hanging for her role in triple hotel bombings in Jordan in 2005.

Al-Rishawi is thought to be the sister of a top Islamic State official.

IS may be cutting Jordan a small break because they're a Muslim country, but they probably aren't going to wait long to execute al-Kaseabeh. The terrorists are getting very good at getting maximum coverage of their beastiality, which no doubt helps in recruiting new members while showing the impotence of big countries to stop them.

Nobody knows how many hostages they are holding, nor who might be next to be executed. In the past, they have mentioned an American woman, and another British hostage, but part of their game is to keep western governments guessing. Also in the past, they have trotted out their next victim after executing their target of the day.

There are many families around the world in agony today, waiting for the next announcement on how Islamic State has chosen to die.

 

A Japanese hostage held by Islamic State was the subject of tense negotiations among Japan, IS, and Jordan over the last 3 days, as IS demanded the release of an Iraqi female terrorist held by Jordan in exchange of the Japanese hostage, Kenji Goto, and a Jordanian air force pilot.

But Jordan refused to release the terrorist until they had proof of life and a guarantee that the hostages would be released. This, Islamic State would not do and late yesterday afternoon, a video appeared on the internet from a media source often used by Islamic State, showing the headless body of Goto.

Fox News:

"I feel indignation over this immoral and heinous act of terrorism," Abe told reporters after convening an emergency Cabinet meeting.

"When I think of the grief of his family, I am left speechless," he said. "We are filled with deep regret."

Japan ordered heightened security precautions Sunday and said it would persist with its non-military support for fighting terrorism.

Threats from ISIS prompted an order for tighter security at airports and at Japanese facilities overseas, such as embassies and schools, government spokesman Yoshihide Suga said.

He said it would be "inappropriate" to comment on the status of the Jordanian pilot.

The failure to save Goto raised fears for the life of the pilot, Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, also held by the militant group that controls about a third of both Syria and Iraq. Unlike some earlier messages delivered in the crisis, the video that circulated online late Saturday purporting to show a militant beheading Goto did not mention the pilot.

Jordan renewed an offer Sunday to swap an Al Qaeda prisoner for al-Kaseasbeh, who was seized after his F-16 crashed near ISIS' de facto capital, Raqqa, Syria, in December.

Government spokesman Mohammed al-Momani told The Associated Press that "we are still ready to hand over" Sajida al-Rishawi, who faces death by hanging for her role in triple hotel bombings in Jordan in 2005.

Al-Rishawi is thought to be the sister of a top Islamic State official.

IS may be cutting Jordan a small break because they're a Muslim country, but they probably aren't going to wait long to execute al-Kaseabeh. The terrorists are getting very good at getting maximum coverage of their beastiality, which no doubt helps in recruiting new members while showing the impotence of big countries to stop them.

Nobody knows how many hostages they are holding, nor who might be next to be executed. In the past, they have mentioned an American woman, and another British hostage, but part of their game is to keep western governments guessing. Also in the past, they have trotted out their next victim after executing their target of the day.

There are many families around the world in agony today, waiting for the next announcement on how Islamic State has chosen to die.