Risky hysteria over summer temperatures in the Midwest

Another Risky Business report on climate change in the United States has been released – this time focusing on the Midwest.  As regular readers will know, the Risky Business Project is chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry (Hank) Paulson, and Thomas (Tom) Steyer, with a committee that includes Robert Rubin, George Shultz, and Olympia Snowe.

The latest Risky Business report shows the following figure illustrating the expected massive increases in average temperatures during the summer months of June through August for a range of Midwestern states.

Between now and the late 21st century, the Midwest is predicted to see average summertime temperatures increase by about 10° F in each of these states.

The best way to address this climate alarmism head-on is to simply show the public the summertime temperatures for Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, and Wisconsin since records began in 1895 – using data direct from the NOAA National Climatic Data Center database.

As the mathematicians would say: QED.  There are no signs of significant trends in average summertime temperatures in any of these states over the past 120 years.

If the complete absence of any increases over the last 12 decades and counting is any indication, the odds of summertime temperatures in these Midwestern states hitting the astronomical Risky Business projections are exceedingly low.

Another Risky Business report on climate change in the United States has been released – this time focusing on the Midwest.  As regular readers will know, the Risky Business Project is chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry (Hank) Paulson, and Thomas (Tom) Steyer, with a committee that includes Robert Rubin, George Shultz, and Olympia Snowe.

The latest Risky Business report shows the following figure illustrating the expected massive increases in average temperatures during the summer months of June through August for a range of Midwestern states.

Between now and the late 21st century, the Midwest is predicted to see average summertime temperatures increase by about 10° F in each of these states.

The best way to address this climate alarmism head-on is to simply show the public the summertime temperatures for Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, and Wisconsin since records began in 1895 – using data direct from the NOAA National Climatic Data Center database.

As the mathematicians would say: QED.  There are no signs of significant trends in average summertime temperatures in any of these states over the past 120 years.

If the complete absence of any increases over the last 12 decades and counting is any indication, the odds of summertime temperatures in these Midwestern states hitting the astronomical Risky Business projections are exceedingly low.