North Korea slams US for imposing more sanctions

I always enjoy it when the US does something to rile the North Koreans. Perhaps it's something to do with the translation, but their outrage is usually expressed in bizarrely colorful ways.

Like this reaction from the North Korean government to the US imposing more sanctions for the Sony hack.

USA Today:

North Korea blasted the U.S. on Sunday for imposing new sanctions in retaliation for its suspected role in the cyberattack against Sony Pictures, saying the move shows the White House's "inveterate repugnancy and hostility" toward the nation.

In a statement carried on the state-run Korean Central News Agency, a spokesman for the foreign ministry again denied the nation was behind the attack, largely seen as a response to Sony's The Interview, a satirical comedy involving a plot to assassinate North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

The reclusive nation accused Sony of producing a "disgusting movie openly agitating terrorism against a sovereign state." It also claimed the U.S. is "kicking off a noisy anti-DPRK campaign, deliberately linking the 'cyber terror' with the DPRK," referring to North Korea's official name, Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"The U.S. anti-DPRK hostile act ... is aimed to save its face and tarnish the image of the DPRK in the international arena at any cost," the statement said.

"Inveterate repugnancy"? A curious juxtaposition of words, to be sure. This kind of frothing at the mouth, mad-dog response easily makes North Korea the most entertaining gangster state in the world.

As for the sanctions themselves, they won't do much to deter the North from hacking someone else. The best course of action is to try and get ahead of the hackers not only in North Korea, but China, Russia, and our home grown cyber terrorists in the US by fashioning better internet protections and detection. Otherwise, other companies may suffer the same humiliation and damage experienced by Sony Corp.

I always enjoy it when the US does something to rile the North Koreans. Perhaps it's something to do with the translation, but their outrage is usually expressed in bizarrely colorful ways.

Like this reaction from the North Korean government to the US imposing more sanctions for the Sony hack.

USA Today:

North Korea blasted the U.S. on Sunday for imposing new sanctions in retaliation for its suspected role in the cyberattack against Sony Pictures, saying the move shows the White House's "inveterate repugnancy and hostility" toward the nation.

In a statement carried on the state-run Korean Central News Agency, a spokesman for the foreign ministry again denied the nation was behind the attack, largely seen as a response to Sony's The Interview, a satirical comedy involving a plot to assassinate North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

The reclusive nation accused Sony of producing a "disgusting movie openly agitating terrorism against a sovereign state." It also claimed the U.S. is "kicking off a noisy anti-DPRK campaign, deliberately linking the 'cyber terror' with the DPRK," referring to North Korea's official name, Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"The U.S. anti-DPRK hostile act ... is aimed to save its face and tarnish the image of the DPRK in the international arena at any cost," the statement said.

"Inveterate repugnancy"? A curious juxtaposition of words, to be sure. This kind of frothing at the mouth, mad-dog response easily makes North Korea the most entertaining gangster state in the world.

As for the sanctions themselves, they won't do much to deter the North from hacking someone else. The best course of action is to try and get ahead of the hackers not only in North Korea, but China, Russia, and our home grown cyber terrorists in the US by fashioning better internet protections and detection. Otherwise, other companies may suffer the same humiliation and damage experienced by Sony Corp.