Lethal compassion

A convicted terrorist with close ties to the Paris massacre can’t be deported from the U.K. because he has a right to his “family life.”  The U.K. Daily Mail reports (hat tip: Jihad Watch)

Baghdad Meziane was jailed for 11 years in 2003 for running a terror network recruiting jihadists and fund-raising for Al-Qaeda.

But despite a judge saying he was a dangerous man and should serve his full sentence then be deported, he was released from prison five years early and allowed to return to his family home in Leicester.

The 50-year-old is an associate of Djamel Beghal, a convicted terrorist whose wife and family live in Leicester and who is said to have mentored two of the Paris attackers while they were in jail together in France.

Britain is believed to have spent the past six years trying to deport Meziane, a father of two. The Home Office has repeatedly described him as a ‘danger to the community of the United Kingdom’.

The British-Algerian, who was born in the Midlands, successfully claimed that his deportation would breach his human right to a family life and that he might face torture if sent home.

He had close links to Beghal, who converted Amedy Coulibaly – the killer of four hostages in a kosher supermarket as well as a police woman in Paris – to radical Islamism while in jail in France.

It is clear that Western values of compassion and individual rights continue to trump realism about the clear and present danger to those values from the jihad war underway, a fight for the destiny of world civilization.  The jihadis mean it when they say they want to inflict hundreds of millions of casualties on the West and establish a global caliphate.  They have so far proven more resolute than their opponents in the West.  It still seems to many, especially those comfortable elitists enjoying their own dominance of Western societies, inconceivable that people so rough and unsophisticated could ever really win in a contest with a technologically and morally superior culture.

That is precisely what they thought in Constantinople, too. 

A convicted terrorist with close ties to the Paris massacre can’t be deported from the U.K. because he has a right to his “family life.”  The U.K. Daily Mail reports (hat tip: Jihad Watch)

Baghdad Meziane was jailed for 11 years in 2003 for running a terror network recruiting jihadists and fund-raising for Al-Qaeda.

But despite a judge saying he was a dangerous man and should serve his full sentence then be deported, he was released from prison five years early and allowed to return to his family home in Leicester.

The 50-year-old is an associate of Djamel Beghal, a convicted terrorist whose wife and family live in Leicester and who is said to have mentored two of the Paris attackers while they were in jail together in France.

Britain is believed to have spent the past six years trying to deport Meziane, a father of two. The Home Office has repeatedly described him as a ‘danger to the community of the United Kingdom’.

The British-Algerian, who was born in the Midlands, successfully claimed that his deportation would breach his human right to a family life and that he might face torture if sent home.

He had close links to Beghal, who converted Amedy Coulibaly – the killer of four hostages in a kosher supermarket as well as a police woman in Paris – to radical Islamism while in jail in France.

It is clear that Western values of compassion and individual rights continue to trump realism about the clear and present danger to those values from the jihad war underway, a fight for the destiny of world civilization.  The jihadis mean it when they say they want to inflict hundreds of millions of casualties on the West and establish a global caliphate.  They have so far proven more resolute than their opponents in the West.  It still seems to many, especially those comfortable elitists enjoying their own dominance of Western societies, inconceivable that people so rough and unsophisticated could ever really win in a contest with a technologically and morally superior culture.

That is precisely what they thought in Constantinople, too.