Jordanian government threatens to kill all Islamic State captives if their pilot is executed

The deadline has passed for a presumed hostage deal between Islamic State and Jordan that would have seen the release of an Iraqi woman terrorist by the Jordanians in exchange for a royal air force pilot and a Japanese civilian held by Islamic state. Jordan says that negotiations are continuing but are demanding proof of life before they release the terrorist.

In fact, Islamic State has refused to say if they would release the pilot even if the terrorist were set free.

Now the Jordanians are saying that if their pilot is executed, they will speed up the judicial process and execute all IS prisoners in their custody.

Daily Mail:

Jordan has threatened to fast-track the execution of a would-be suicide bomber the Islamic State is trying to free if the terror group kills its captured pilot, it was reported today.

The government has apparently warned that Sajida al-Rishawi and other jailed ISIS commanders would be 'quickly judged and sentenced' in revenge for Muath al-Kaseasbeh's death.

It comes after a deadline for a possible prisoner swap allegedly set by ISIS passed yesterday with no clue over the fate of al-Kaseasbeh or fellow Japanese hostage Kenji Goto.

Intelligence sources said ISIS's refusal to prove that al-Kaseasbeh was alive meant any deal with the militants was doomed.

Now Jordan has reportedly stepped up its rhetoric by warning of its intent to retaliate if the negotiations end in bloodshed.

Elijah Magnier, chief international correspondent for Kuwait's Al Rai newspaper, told MailOnline: 'I have reliable contact in the Jordanian government who says a message has been passed to ISIS.

'It warns that if they kill the pilot they will implement the death sentences for Sajida and other ISIS prisoners as soon as possible.

'There are other prisoners in Jordan that ISIS would like to free.' 

MailOnline has attempted to contact the Jordanian government for comment, but a spokesman has not yet responded.

Shortly after reports of the ultimatum emerged, Jordan issued a statement saying they were still waiting for proof that the captured F-16 pilot was still alive. 

Jordan had agreed to an ISIS demand to free al-Rishawi who failed to fulfil her Al Qaeda mission as a suicide bomber.

In return, ISIS said it would not execute the 26-year-old pilot, who was seized in December after crashing near its HQ in the Syrian city of Raqqa. 

In its latest audio recording, ISIS threatened to kill al-Kaseasbeh if a deadline was not kept for the release of al-Rishawi by dusk Iraq time yesterday - around 5.30pm (2.30pm GMT).

But it appeared to make no promises to release him, another condition the Jordanian government is demanding.

It was not clear from the recording what would happen to Mr Goto if the deadline was missed.  

This is certainly a unique negotiating strategy on the part of the Jordanians, but will it have any effect? If Islamic State has proven anything, it is that the terrorists are deaf to pleas of mercy and put little value on human life. One would surmise that this attitude extends to their own people as well. It may be emotionally satisfying for the Jordanians to execute their Islamic State prisoners following the death of their pilot, but it isn't likely to deter the terrorists from making their propaganda points.
 
Unles IS sees releasing the hostages as more beneficial to their cause than executing them, the outcome of these negotiations are not in doubt. For the moment, Islamic State believes it to be in their interest to dangle this hostage deal before both Jordan and Japan, showing their ability to make nations dance to their tune. Unfortunately for the hostages, the music is bound to stop soon.
 
 

The deadline has passed for a presumed hostage deal between Islamic State and Jordan that would have seen the release of an Iraqi woman terrorist by the Jordanians in exchange for a royal air force pilot and a Japanese civilian held by Islamic state. Jordan says that negotiations are continuing but are demanding proof of life before they release the terrorist.

In fact, Islamic State has refused to say if they would release the pilot even if the terrorist were set free.

Now the Jordanians are saying that if their pilot is executed, they will speed up the judicial process and execute all IS prisoners in their custody.

Daily Mail:

Jordan has threatened to fast-track the execution of a would-be suicide bomber the Islamic State is trying to free if the terror group kills its captured pilot, it was reported today.

The government has apparently warned that Sajida al-Rishawi and other jailed ISIS commanders would be 'quickly judged and sentenced' in revenge for Muath al-Kaseasbeh's death.

It comes after a deadline for a possible prisoner swap allegedly set by ISIS passed yesterday with no clue over the fate of al-Kaseasbeh or fellow Japanese hostage Kenji Goto.

Intelligence sources said ISIS's refusal to prove that al-Kaseasbeh was alive meant any deal with the militants was doomed.

Now Jordan has reportedly stepped up its rhetoric by warning of its intent to retaliate if the negotiations end in bloodshed.

Elijah Magnier, chief international correspondent for Kuwait's Al Rai newspaper, told MailOnline: 'I have reliable contact in the Jordanian government who says a message has been passed to ISIS.

'It warns that if they kill the pilot they will implement the death sentences for Sajida and other ISIS prisoners as soon as possible.

'There are other prisoners in Jordan that ISIS would like to free.' 

MailOnline has attempted to contact the Jordanian government for comment, but a spokesman has not yet responded.

Shortly after reports of the ultimatum emerged, Jordan issued a statement saying they were still waiting for proof that the captured F-16 pilot was still alive. 

Jordan had agreed to an ISIS demand to free al-Rishawi who failed to fulfil her Al Qaeda mission as a suicide bomber.

In return, ISIS said it would not execute the 26-year-old pilot, who was seized in December after crashing near its HQ in the Syrian city of Raqqa. 

In its latest audio recording, ISIS threatened to kill al-Kaseasbeh if a deadline was not kept for the release of al-Rishawi by dusk Iraq time yesterday - around 5.30pm (2.30pm GMT).

But it appeared to make no promises to release him, another condition the Jordanian government is demanding.

It was not clear from the recording what would happen to Mr Goto if the deadline was missed.  

This is certainly a unique negotiating strategy on the part of the Jordanians, but will it have any effect? If Islamic State has proven anything, it is that the terrorists are deaf to pleas of mercy and put little value on human life. One would surmise that this attitude extends to their own people as well. It may be emotionally satisfying for the Jordanians to execute their Islamic State prisoners following the death of their pilot, but it isn't likely to deter the terrorists from making their propaganda points.
 
Unles IS sees releasing the hostages as more beneficial to their cause than executing them, the outcome of these negotiations are not in doubt. For the moment, Islamic State believes it to be in their interest to dangle this hostage deal before both Jordan and Japan, showing their ability to make nations dance to their tune. Unfortunately for the hostages, the music is bound to stop soon.