Jane Fonda regrets 'Hanoi Jane' activities that made her unpopular

Media, even conservative media, are characterizing Jane Fonda’s remarks Friday as an “apology” for her actions in Vietnam.  Most notoriously, she posed with an anti-aircraft gun crew who were shooting down American planes, clearly aligning herself with people who were killing Americans in combat (which, by the way, arguably fits the definition of treason, for which she was never prosecuted).

Based on the AP report of her remarks, I am not so sure it was an apology:

Fonda told the audience she made a "huge mistake'' that led many to think she was against soldiers fighting in Vietnam, and it's something that she'll take to her grave. She says she understands their anger and that it makes her sad.

I am very familiar with the line of argument used by leftist anti-war protesters, at the time and ever since.  They claimed to “support the troops” because they wanted to bring them home from an unjust war.  Fonda’s remarks could fit into that framework.  She “understands their anger” because they misinterpreted her appearance with the gun used to kill them.  She meant to encourage an end to the war (aka surrender, as eventually happened in no small part due to the activities of people like Fonda).

She could well be regretting doing something that made her unpopular, and that people “misinterpreted.”

There is a way for Fonda to clear this all up: apologize for supporting a ruthless communist dictatorship at war with her own country, and for hastening the American withdrawal that led to horrifying slaughter and enslavement of millions.

Now that would be an apology.

Media, even conservative media, are characterizing Jane Fonda’s remarks Friday as an “apology” for her actions in Vietnam.  Most notoriously, she posed with an anti-aircraft gun crew who were shooting down American planes, clearly aligning herself with people who were killing Americans in combat (which, by the way, arguably fits the definition of treason, for which she was never prosecuted).

Based on the AP report of her remarks, I am not so sure it was an apology:

Fonda told the audience she made a "huge mistake'' that led many to think she was against soldiers fighting in Vietnam, and it's something that she'll take to her grave. She says she understands their anger and that it makes her sad.

I am very familiar with the line of argument used by leftist anti-war protesters, at the time and ever since.  They claimed to “support the troops” because they wanted to bring them home from an unjust war.  Fonda’s remarks could fit into that framework.  She “understands their anger” because they misinterpreted her appearance with the gun used to kill them.  She meant to encourage an end to the war (aka surrender, as eventually happened in no small part due to the activities of people like Fonda).

She could well be regretting doing something that made her unpopular, and that people “misinterpreted.”

There is a way for Fonda to clear this all up: apologize for supporting a ruthless communist dictatorship at war with her own country, and for hastening the American withdrawal that led to horrifying slaughter and enslavement of millions.

Now that would be an apology.