Israel hits Hezb'allah terror cell in Syria

Israel is a country that has absolutely no problem with enemy identification – no matter where that enemy is.  If he is in the reach of their military power, they will act.

The elegant simplicity of this policy was made clear yesterday when Israeli helicopters launched a fusillade of missiles at a Hezb'allah convoy in Syria near the Golan Heights, killing several terrorists, including the son of a former military commander.

Reuters:

An Israeli helicopter strike in Syria killed a commander from Lebanon's Hezbollah and the son of the group's late military leader Imad Moughniyah, Hezbollah said, in a major blow that could lead to reprisal attacks.

The strike hit a convoy carrying Jihad Moughniyah and commander Mohamad Issa, known as Abu Issa, in the province of Quneitra, near the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, killing six Hezbollah members in all, a statement from the group said.

It comes just days after Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah said frequent Israeli strikes in Syria were a major aggression, that the group was stronger than before and that Syria and its allies had the right to respond.

Shi'ite Muslim Hezbollah, which is backed by Iran and fought a 34-day war with Israel in 2006, has been fighting alongside President Bashar al-Assad's forces in Syria's four-year war.

Iran's semi-official Tabnak news site said several of its Revolutionary Guards had also been killed in the attack, without giving further details. State-run Iranian television said the identity of the "martyrs" could not be confirmed.

The Hezbollah-run al-Manar news channel said the Israeli attack suggested "the enemy has gone crazy because of Hezbollah's growing capabilities and it could lead to a costly adventure that will put the Middle East at stake".

Israel's military declined to comment, but an Israeli security source confirmed to Reuters that the Israeli military had carried out the attack.

It was not immediately clear what role Jihad Moughniyah, in his 20s, was playing in the fighting in Syria.

Israel is banking on Hezb'allah being too busy fighting the insurgency in Syria to respond with much force.  It would seem like a good bet.  Most of Hezb'allah's best militia units are not in Lebanon, and the terrorists would be foolhardy to risk an aggressive Israeli response to an incursion into Israel.  In 2006, Hezb'allah was prepared for war with Israel.  Today, not so much.

So the terrorists can fume all they want; the fact is, they are vulnerable to these kinds of strikes and can't do a darn thing either to stop Israel or to respond effectively.  Their adventure in Syria has already cost them politically at home.  Now Israel is showing them to be weak militarily.  Hezb'allah leader Hassan Nasrallah may already be ruing the day he sent his fighters into Syria.

Israel is a country that has absolutely no problem with enemy identification – no matter where that enemy is.  If he is in the reach of their military power, they will act.

The elegant simplicity of this policy was made clear yesterday when Israeli helicopters launched a fusillade of missiles at a Hezb'allah convoy in Syria near the Golan Heights, killing several terrorists, including the son of a former military commander.

Reuters:

An Israeli helicopter strike in Syria killed a commander from Lebanon's Hezbollah and the son of the group's late military leader Imad Moughniyah, Hezbollah said, in a major blow that could lead to reprisal attacks.

The strike hit a convoy carrying Jihad Moughniyah and commander Mohamad Issa, known as Abu Issa, in the province of Quneitra, near the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, killing six Hezbollah members in all, a statement from the group said.

It comes just days after Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah said frequent Israeli strikes in Syria were a major aggression, that the group was stronger than before and that Syria and its allies had the right to respond.

Shi'ite Muslim Hezbollah, which is backed by Iran and fought a 34-day war with Israel in 2006, has been fighting alongside President Bashar al-Assad's forces in Syria's four-year war.

Iran's semi-official Tabnak news site said several of its Revolutionary Guards had also been killed in the attack, without giving further details. State-run Iranian television said the identity of the "martyrs" could not be confirmed.

The Hezbollah-run al-Manar news channel said the Israeli attack suggested "the enemy has gone crazy because of Hezbollah's growing capabilities and it could lead to a costly adventure that will put the Middle East at stake".

Israel's military declined to comment, but an Israeli security source confirmed to Reuters that the Israeli military had carried out the attack.

It was not immediately clear what role Jihad Moughniyah, in his 20s, was playing in the fighting in Syria.

Israel is banking on Hezb'allah being too busy fighting the insurgency in Syria to respond with much force.  It would seem like a good bet.  Most of Hezb'allah's best militia units are not in Lebanon, and the terrorists would be foolhardy to risk an aggressive Israeli response to an incursion into Israel.  In 2006, Hezb'allah was prepared for war with Israel.  Today, not so much.

So the terrorists can fume all they want; the fact is, they are vulnerable to these kinds of strikes and can't do a darn thing either to stop Israel or to respond effectively.  Their adventure in Syria has already cost them politically at home.  Now Israel is showing them to be weak militarily.  Hezb'allah leader Hassan Nasrallah may already be ruing the day he sent his fighters into Syria.