Al-Qaeda suspect awaiting trial in embassy bombings dies of liver disease

Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, also known by Abu Anas al-Libi, died in a New York hospital as a result of complications from liver disease. al-Libi was suspected of being involved in the 1998 African embassy bombings.

Washington Examiner:

“We write now to inform the court that despite the care provided at the hospital, his condition deteriorated rapidly,” wrote Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, in a letter to the judge overseeing the case.

Al-Libi was accused of being involved in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya.

He was captured by U.S. special forces on the streets of Tripoli in Libya in 2013.

"I accuse the American government of kidnapping, mistreating, and killing an innocent man. He did nothing," his wife told the Associated Press.

An indictment filed against al-Libi in 2000 accused him of helping conduct “visual and photographic surveillance” against the U.S. embassy in Kenya in 1993 and 1995.

Al-Libi was captured outside of his home in Tripoli in 2013:

Al-Libi, who had pleaded not guilty to the charges against him, was moved to New York to await trial after being interrogated on a U.S. warship immediately after his capture. Federal prosecutors accused al-Libi of participating of sitting on a consultation council for al-Qaeda that discussed and approved terrorist operations.

Al-Libi was believed to be a computer specialist with al-Qaeda. He studied electronic and nuclear engineering, graduating from Tripoli University, and opposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi's rule.

He is believed to have spent time in Sudan, where Osama bin Laden was based in the early 1990s. After bin Laden was forced to leave Sudan, al-Libi turned up in Britain in 1995, where he was granted political asylum under unclear circumstances and lived in Manchester. He was arrested by Scotland Yard in 1999 but released because of lack of evidence and later fled Britain. After his indictment, U.S. officials said they believed he was hiding in Afghanistan.

Al-Libi was trying to make the case that his involvement was limited to surveillance of targets. Why should that have limited his punishment if he had lived to stand trial? Someone who scopes out a bank and doesn't participate in the heist is as guilty of bank robbery as the guys with the guns.

Good riddance to one of al-Qaeda's worst.

Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, also known by Abu Anas al-Libi, died in a New York hospital as a result of complications from liver disease. al-Libi was suspected of being involved in the 1998 African embassy bombings.

Washington Examiner:

“We write now to inform the court that despite the care provided at the hospital, his condition deteriorated rapidly,” wrote Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, in a letter to the judge overseeing the case.

Al-Libi was accused of being involved in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya.

He was captured by U.S. special forces on the streets of Tripoli in Libya in 2013.

"I accuse the American government of kidnapping, mistreating, and killing an innocent man. He did nothing," his wife told the Associated Press.

An indictment filed against al-Libi in 2000 accused him of helping conduct “visual and photographic surveillance” against the U.S. embassy in Kenya in 1993 and 1995.

Al-Libi was captured outside of his home in Tripoli in 2013:

Al-Libi, who had pleaded not guilty to the charges against him, was moved to New York to await trial after being interrogated on a U.S. warship immediately after his capture. Federal prosecutors accused al-Libi of participating of sitting on a consultation council for al-Qaeda that discussed and approved terrorist operations.

Al-Libi was believed to be a computer specialist with al-Qaeda. He studied electronic and nuclear engineering, graduating from Tripoli University, and opposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi's rule.

He is believed to have spent time in Sudan, where Osama bin Laden was based in the early 1990s. After bin Laden was forced to leave Sudan, al-Libi turned up in Britain in 1995, where he was granted political asylum under unclear circumstances and lived in Manchester. He was arrested by Scotland Yard in 1999 but released because of lack of evidence and later fled Britain. After his indictment, U.S. officials said they believed he was hiding in Afghanistan.

Al-Libi was trying to make the case that his involvement was limited to surveillance of targets. Why should that have limited his punishment if he had lived to stand trial? Someone who scopes out a bank and doesn't participate in the heist is as guilty of bank robbery as the guys with the guns.

Good riddance to one of al-Qaeda's worst.