80% of Utah residents don't think humans are primary drivers of climate change

In a poll by UtahPolicy.com, conducted from December 2-10, 2014, with a margin of error of ±4 percent, the following findings were obtained:

The correct way to interpret this poll is as follows: only 22 percent of respondents think the "human use of carbon fuels is primarily responsible" for climate change.  Thus, 78 percent of Utah residents do not believe that the human use of carbon fuels is primarily responsible for any changes to the climate.

The largest segment (35 percent) of the respondents indicated that the climate is warming and that humans are partly responsible, but "partly responsible" means any number greater than zero percent human blame up to any number less than or equal to 50 percent human responsibility.  Given the fear of being labeled a "climate denier," most climate skeptic members of the public will, when asked, just give the politically correct equivalent to their true opinions.  Namely, sure, the climate is changing (it always has), and yes, humans are undoubtedly partly responsible for some unspecified (and potentially insignificantly small) portion of this nebulously defined change.

Once again, this is another poll indicating that the vast majority of the public is simply not buying into climate hysteria.

In a poll by UtahPolicy.com, conducted from December 2-10, 2014, with a margin of error of ±4 percent, the following findings were obtained:

The correct way to interpret this poll is as follows: only 22 percent of respondents think the "human use of carbon fuels is primarily responsible" for climate change.  Thus, 78 percent of Utah residents do not believe that the human use of carbon fuels is primarily responsible for any changes to the climate.

The largest segment (35 percent) of the respondents indicated that the climate is warming and that humans are partly responsible, but "partly responsible" means any number greater than zero percent human blame up to any number less than or equal to 50 percent human responsibility.  Given the fear of being labeled a "climate denier," most climate skeptic members of the public will, when asked, just give the politically correct equivalent to their true opinions.  Namely, sure, the climate is changing (it always has), and yes, humans are undoubtedly partly responsible for some unspecified (and potentially insignificantly small) portion of this nebulously defined change.

Once again, this is another poll indicating that the vast majority of the public is simply not buying into climate hysteria.