Living life through a lopsided lens

The victim class in America is growing in leaps and bounds.  People are so eager to join the pity party that some are willing to lie in order to be accepted into the Club of the Oppressed, Downtrodden, and Exploited (CODE).  

As we know, it’s not just ordinary folks clamoring to submit their application to this exclusive club.  POTUS and FLOTUS set examples of Victimhood (so elevated is it that it is written with a capital “V”) every chance they get.  In fact, Michelle Obama’s recent telling of the Target tale took on a new spin compared to her telling two years ago.

First, the most recent telling: per a People Magazine interview, the first lady injected racism into the story when recalling her infamous 2011 trip to Target.  Apparently while she was there, all manner of horrors occurred.

… I tell this story – I mean, even as the first lady – during that wonderfully publicized trip I took to Target, not highly disguised, the only person who came up to me in the store was a woman who asked me to help her take something off a shelf. Because she didn’t see me as the first lady, she saw me as someone who could help her. Those kinds of things happen in life. So it isn’t anything new.

One can only assume that the evil customer was white.

Michelle Obama claimed she was not heavily disguised (sure, Michelle, whatever you say), and yet no one recognized her as the first lady – and as a black first lady, no less.  Even more outrageous, a customer in the store had the nerve to ask her for help getting something down from a tall shelf.

Ah-ha!  Proof positive!  Those damn disrespectful racist Target customers!

You see, a black person can’t go anywhere without some white person treating her like some kind of minimum-wage worker.  The help-with-a-tall-shelf fiasco unearthed that persistent nugget of racism that is everywhere one turns!  

I simply had to laugh.  I mean, seriously, Michelle.  (And I call her that with all due respect.)  Just off the top of my head, a few things come to mind:

- No one recognized the first lady because she was well-disguised – and intentionally so for security reasons.

- The Secret Service controlled a wide radius around the first lady, limiting access to her, again, for security reasons.

- Since Target employees wear trademark red shirts...

...it seems reasonable to assume that the customer asked Michelle for help reaching something because Michelle is tall, not because she was a Target employee.  And even if she did think the first lady worked there, this kind of mistake is common.  It’s happened to me more times than I can recount.  Not to mention, why is it so insulting that someone might think you work at Target?

Rewind a couple of years: Michelle Obama told the same story (ish) in 2012 on The David Letterman Show.  Here’s how she described the scenario after Letterman held up a photo of her at Target, as The Right Scoop reports (video embedded in the link):

“That’s my Target run. I went to Target,” she said. “I thought I was undercover. I have to tell you something about this trip though. No one knew that was me because a woman actually walked up to me, right? I was in the detergent aisle, and she said — I kid you not — she said, ‘Excuse me, I just have to ask you something,’ and I thought, ‘Oh, cover’s blown.’ She said, ‘Can you reach on that shelf and hand me the detergent?’  I kid you not.”

As the audience laughed, she went on, “And the only thing she said — I reached up, ’cause she was short, and I reached up, pulled it down — she said, ‘Well, you didn’t have to make it look so easy.’ That was my interaction. I felt so good. … She had no idea who I was. I thought, as soon as she walked up — I was with my assistant, and I said, ‘This is it, it’s over. We’re going to have to leave.’ She just needed the detergent.”

So in 2012, the story was all about going to Target undercover and her identity being so well-masked that a customer didn’t recognize her and simply asked for help with something – an interaction the first lady felt good about.

That was then.

This is now.

What a difference two years makes.  Now racial division and hatred has been ginned up, with the Obama’s leading the charge.  So Michelle, in retelling her Target tale for People Magazine, put a completely different spin on it.  Now it’s all about racism and disrespect.

Victimization has risen to stratospheric heights.  If lying, stretching the truth, or manipulating a story is required to have the most dramatic impact, no problem.  Fiction and nonfiction have merged to create a new reality – if also a false one.

And speaking of falsehoods and lies, what did Obama have to say for himself in the People Magazine interview?

Among other things, he made the outlandish claim that all black men have had the experience of being treated like a car valet.  In response, Thomas Lifson wrote in his blog on the subject, using the utmost restraint and understatement: “This is universal?”

I mean, seriously, Barack.  (And I call him that with all due respect.)

But this wasn’t the first time, nor likely will it be the last, that our president offered up a (presumably true) story and generalized from it.  Last year Obama spoke of how common it is for black men to hear the “click” of car door locks when crossing the street.

I have no reason to disbelieve this.  But here’s my question: does Barack Obama or any other black man know what drivers do when they see people cross the street who are not black?  Of course they don’t.  Because they can speak only from their experience.  So with that in mind, allow me to share my experience as a driver:

Whenever I’m out driving, I’m prompted to check the door locks when I see a person or group of people near my car.  This heightened awareness developed after seeing Reginald Denny pulled from his truck and beaten senseless during the LA riots.  After that, I became acutely aware of how vulnerable I am in my car.  It doesn’t matter if I see a tattooed skin-head or a woman with a stroller near my car.  It’s America in the 21st century, and there are lots of loons out there.  Seeing anyone near my car reminds me of my vulnerability.  And I check my locks.  And if the doors are unlocked, I lock them.

“Click.”

But maybe that’s just me.  Even so, my guess is that black men are not the only group who experience the “click” of the door lock when they walk by.  Teenage boys of a certain ilk, drunk people, folks who appear agitated, as well as homeless and/or mentally ill individuals likely also hear the “click” more than others might.  Some drivers might be racist, but my guess is that most simply use common sense.  Given that a disproportionate amount of crime is committed by black people, there’s nothing unreasonable about people being aware of this fact and behaving accordingly.  Heck, even Jesse Jackson admitted to feeling relief when he hears someone walking behind him at night and he turns and sees it’s a white person.

In closing, let me recall a rather infamous error regarding a person’s role, job, title, and rank.  I seem to recall…um…let’s see…wasn’t it…?  Oh, yes.  That would be Valerie Jarrett who mistook a 4-star general for a waiter.

As Mark Steyn recently wrote:

The problem with a victim culture is that so many people want to join the ranks of victimhood that eventually you run short of oppressors.

Any bets when that might happen?

Photos: hat tip to Tom Maguire

The victim class in America is growing in leaps and bounds.  People are so eager to join the pity party that some are willing to lie in order to be accepted into the Club of the Oppressed, Downtrodden, and Exploited (CODE).  

As we know, it’s not just ordinary folks clamoring to submit their application to this exclusive club.  POTUS and FLOTUS set examples of Victimhood (so elevated is it that it is written with a capital “V”) every chance they get.  In fact, Michelle Obama’s recent telling of the Target tale took on a new spin compared to her telling two years ago.

First, the most recent telling: per a People Magazine interview, the first lady injected racism into the story when recalling her infamous 2011 trip to Target.  Apparently while she was there, all manner of horrors occurred.

… I tell this story – I mean, even as the first lady – during that wonderfully publicized trip I took to Target, not highly disguised, the only person who came up to me in the store was a woman who asked me to help her take something off a shelf. Because she didn’t see me as the first lady, she saw me as someone who could help her. Those kinds of things happen in life. So it isn’t anything new.

One can only assume that the evil customer was white.

Michelle Obama claimed she was not heavily disguised (sure, Michelle, whatever you say), and yet no one recognized her as the first lady – and as a black first lady, no less.  Even more outrageous, a customer in the store had the nerve to ask her for help getting something down from a tall shelf.

Ah-ha!  Proof positive!  Those damn disrespectful racist Target customers!

You see, a black person can’t go anywhere without some white person treating her like some kind of minimum-wage worker.  The help-with-a-tall-shelf fiasco unearthed that persistent nugget of racism that is everywhere one turns!  

I simply had to laugh.  I mean, seriously, Michelle.  (And I call her that with all due respect.)  Just off the top of my head, a few things come to mind:

- No one recognized the first lady because she was well-disguised – and intentionally so for security reasons.

- The Secret Service controlled a wide radius around the first lady, limiting access to her, again, for security reasons.

- Since Target employees wear trademark red shirts...

...it seems reasonable to assume that the customer asked Michelle for help reaching something because Michelle is tall, not because she was a Target employee.  And even if she did think the first lady worked there, this kind of mistake is common.  It’s happened to me more times than I can recount.  Not to mention, why is it so insulting that someone might think you work at Target?

Rewind a couple of years: Michelle Obama told the same story (ish) in 2012 on The David Letterman Show.  Here’s how she described the scenario after Letterman held up a photo of her at Target, as The Right Scoop reports (video embedded in the link):

“That’s my Target run. I went to Target,” she said. “I thought I was undercover. I have to tell you something about this trip though. No one knew that was me because a woman actually walked up to me, right? I was in the detergent aisle, and she said — I kid you not — she said, ‘Excuse me, I just have to ask you something,’ and I thought, ‘Oh, cover’s blown.’ She said, ‘Can you reach on that shelf and hand me the detergent?’  I kid you not.”

As the audience laughed, she went on, “And the only thing she said — I reached up, ’cause she was short, and I reached up, pulled it down — she said, ‘Well, you didn’t have to make it look so easy.’ That was my interaction. I felt so good. … She had no idea who I was. I thought, as soon as she walked up — I was with my assistant, and I said, ‘This is it, it’s over. We’re going to have to leave.’ She just needed the detergent.”

So in 2012, the story was all about going to Target undercover and her identity being so well-masked that a customer didn’t recognize her and simply asked for help with something – an interaction the first lady felt good about.

That was then.

This is now.

What a difference two years makes.  Now racial division and hatred has been ginned up, with the Obama’s leading the charge.  So Michelle, in retelling her Target tale for People Magazine, put a completely different spin on it.  Now it’s all about racism and disrespect.

Victimization has risen to stratospheric heights.  If lying, stretching the truth, or manipulating a story is required to have the most dramatic impact, no problem.  Fiction and nonfiction have merged to create a new reality – if also a false one.

And speaking of falsehoods and lies, what did Obama have to say for himself in the People Magazine interview?

Among other things, he made the outlandish claim that all black men have had the experience of being treated like a car valet.  In response, Thomas Lifson wrote in his blog on the subject, using the utmost restraint and understatement: “This is universal?”

I mean, seriously, Barack.  (And I call him that with all due respect.)

But this wasn’t the first time, nor likely will it be the last, that our president offered up a (presumably true) story and generalized from it.  Last year Obama spoke of how common it is for black men to hear the “click” of car door locks when crossing the street.

I have no reason to disbelieve this.  But here’s my question: does Barack Obama or any other black man know what drivers do when they see people cross the street who are not black?  Of course they don’t.  Because they can speak only from their experience.  So with that in mind, allow me to share my experience as a driver:

Whenever I’m out driving, I’m prompted to check the door locks when I see a person or group of people near my car.  This heightened awareness developed after seeing Reginald Denny pulled from his truck and beaten senseless during the LA riots.  After that, I became acutely aware of how vulnerable I am in my car.  It doesn’t matter if I see a tattooed skin-head or a woman with a stroller near my car.  It’s America in the 21st century, and there are lots of loons out there.  Seeing anyone near my car reminds me of my vulnerability.  And I check my locks.  And if the doors are unlocked, I lock them.

“Click.”

But maybe that’s just me.  Even so, my guess is that black men are not the only group who experience the “click” of the door lock when they walk by.  Teenage boys of a certain ilk, drunk people, folks who appear agitated, as well as homeless and/or mentally ill individuals likely also hear the “click” more than others might.  Some drivers might be racist, but my guess is that most simply use common sense.  Given that a disproportionate amount of crime is committed by black people, there’s nothing unreasonable about people being aware of this fact and behaving accordingly.  Heck, even Jesse Jackson admitted to feeling relief when he hears someone walking behind him at night and he turns and sees it’s a white person.

In closing, let me recall a rather infamous error regarding a person’s role, job, title, and rank.  I seem to recall…um…let’s see…wasn’t it…?  Oh, yes.  That would be Valerie Jarrett who mistook a 4-star general for a waiter.

As Mark Steyn recently wrote:

The problem with a victim culture is that so many people want to join the ranks of victimhood that eventually you run short of oppressors.

Any bets when that might happen?

Photos: hat tip to Tom Maguire