Leftist scours the globe for black youth killed by white police

The headline at the Huffington Post by Beverly Bell reads: “Another Black Boy Gunned Down By Police.”  Above the body of the article is a graphic photograph of a boy lying dead in the street, a pool of blood pouring out of the back of his head.  Several police cars and policemen are standing a slight distance away.

We will never learn of the names, lives and deaths of countless Black men and boys murdered by police -- and slavery enforcers, hate groups, vigilantes, and a host of others -- dating back to the earliest days of this country's history. The names and stories of a slew of recent victims of extrajudicial executions, such as Eric Garner and Michael Brown, and the exoneration of their killers, have become widely known through the blowback of public fury.

This is a tale of another Black boy whose name and wrongful death were never reported in any official document or national media. The policeman responsible was not charged, indicted, or prosecuted. This child's prematurely snuffed life was not spent in the U.S. but in the Black nation of Haiti, though the U.S. government subsidized his murderer. (snip)

The U.S. has had a hand in taking down these Black lives. In the three years since Martelly was imposed, the U.S. has underwritten his unaccountable "security" forces to the tune of $73 million, courtesy of our tax dollars. The US has also sold the Haitian government weapons that make the assaults possible. (This same support has gone to many a Haitian autocrat, notably François and Jean-Claude Duvalier.) (snip)

Haitian and UN forces are Daniel Panteleo, the NYPD officer who strangled Eric Garner to death as he placidly vended cigarettes on a sidewalk. They are Darren Wilson, the St. Louis cop who shot the unarmed teenager Michael Brown seven or eight times. These badge-wearers, and so many more like them, stand above the law.

If I may…

First, according to the CIA, approximately 95% of Haitians are black.  So unless the remaining 5% of non-black Haitians make up the police force, it’s reasonable to assume the vast majority of police officers in Haiti are black.  If you Google “Haiti police photographs,” the pictures support the logical assumption that most, if not just about all, Haitian police officers are black.

I can’t account for the integrity of police activity in Haiti.  However, in light of the fact that the police are black, it’s utterly, totally, completely, and one hundred percent bogus for someone to cry “racism!” in light of demographic facts.

Second, Bell toots the now familiar cherry-picked refrain that Black (uppercase) lives matter.  Though apparently that’s the case only if a white police officer has no other recourse than to shoot a black suspect.  Otherwise, meh.

Third, Bell is so determined to make sure the headlines keep coming about blacks killed by the police that even though she had to go to Haiti for this one, and even though the police were in all likelihood black, it didn’t take her but a paragraph to find a way to blame the United States.  Apparently it’s our fault this boy was shot dead on a Haitian street.

Bell continued to build the case, going so far as to drag NYPD officer Daniel Pantoleo and Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson into it, noting: “These badge-wearers, and so many more like them, stand above the law.”

Among numerous things that seem lost on Bell is the fact that the police enforce the law and in so doing encounter all manner of folks who apparently feel that they stand above the law...by breaking it.  But if the author is so convinced the police are reckless, have no respect for human life (especially black lives), and place themselves above the law, she is welcome to never – ever – in her life dial 911 or utilize police services for herself or her loved ones.

The headline at the Huffington Post by Beverly Bell reads: “Another Black Boy Gunned Down By Police.”  Above the body of the article is a graphic photograph of a boy lying dead in the street, a pool of blood pouring out of the back of his head.  Several police cars and policemen are standing a slight distance away.

We will never learn of the names, lives and deaths of countless Black men and boys murdered by police -- and slavery enforcers, hate groups, vigilantes, and a host of others -- dating back to the earliest days of this country's history. The names and stories of a slew of recent victims of extrajudicial executions, such as Eric Garner and Michael Brown, and the exoneration of their killers, have become widely known through the blowback of public fury.

This is a tale of another Black boy whose name and wrongful death were never reported in any official document or national media. The policeman responsible was not charged, indicted, or prosecuted. This child's prematurely snuffed life was not spent in the U.S. but in the Black nation of Haiti, though the U.S. government subsidized his murderer. (snip)

The U.S. has had a hand in taking down these Black lives. In the three years since Martelly was imposed, the U.S. has underwritten his unaccountable "security" forces to the tune of $73 million, courtesy of our tax dollars. The US has also sold the Haitian government weapons that make the assaults possible. (This same support has gone to many a Haitian autocrat, notably François and Jean-Claude Duvalier.) (snip)

Haitian and UN forces are Daniel Panteleo, the NYPD officer who strangled Eric Garner to death as he placidly vended cigarettes on a sidewalk. They are Darren Wilson, the St. Louis cop who shot the unarmed teenager Michael Brown seven or eight times. These badge-wearers, and so many more like them, stand above the law.

If I may…

First, according to the CIA, approximately 95% of Haitians are black.  So unless the remaining 5% of non-black Haitians make up the police force, it’s reasonable to assume the vast majority of police officers in Haiti are black.  If you Google “Haiti police photographs,” the pictures support the logical assumption that most, if not just about all, Haitian police officers are black.

I can’t account for the integrity of police activity in Haiti.  However, in light of the fact that the police are black, it’s utterly, totally, completely, and one hundred percent bogus for someone to cry “racism!” in light of demographic facts.

Second, Bell toots the now familiar cherry-picked refrain that Black (uppercase) lives matter.  Though apparently that’s the case only if a white police officer has no other recourse than to shoot a black suspect.  Otherwise, meh.

Third, Bell is so determined to make sure the headlines keep coming about blacks killed by the police that even though she had to go to Haiti for this one, and even though the police were in all likelihood black, it didn’t take her but a paragraph to find a way to blame the United States.  Apparently it’s our fault this boy was shot dead on a Haitian street.

Bell continued to build the case, going so far as to drag NYPD officer Daniel Pantoleo and Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson into it, noting: “These badge-wearers, and so many more like them, stand above the law.”

Among numerous things that seem lost on Bell is the fact that the police enforce the law and in so doing encounter all manner of folks who apparently feel that they stand above the law...by breaking it.  But if the author is so convinced the police are reckless, have no respect for human life (especially black lives), and place themselves above the law, she is welcome to never – ever – in her life dial 911 or utilize police services for herself or her loved ones.