'How many more dead police officers will the mob want'?

Jack Dunphy is a pseudonym used by a working LAPD police officer and has been writing for PJ Media for several years. His articles are always informative and give a worm's eye view of what it's like on America's mean streets for policemen who risk their lives every day to keep us safe.

His take on the execution of two cops in New York is emotional and instructive:

“What do we want?” came the shouted question from the marchers in New York City on Dec. 13.

“Dead cops!” came the reply.

“When do we want it?”

“Now!”

It took seven days, perhaps too long to satisfy the mob’s impatience, but now that they have two dead police officers, how many more will they want?

I have for years instructed young police officers placed in my charge that they cannot go about their duties thinking everyone they meet will try to kill them.  But, I warn them, nor can they forget that some people will.  With this unsettling fact in mind, police officers train for various scenarios in which they might find themselves endangered.  How will we respond if that liquor store on the corner is being robbed?  Can we see inside?  Is there a back door?  Is there a getaway car idling nearby?  Could there be a layoff man waiting unseen for the opportunity to ambush us?

Or take a scenario as simple as a traffic stop.  How many people are in the car?  What are they doing as we approach?  Are they tracking us in the mirrors?  Can we see their hands?  Where is our closest cover if one of them pulls a gun?  Will bystanders be endangered if we have to open fire?

The scenarios and the questions are endless, and they are on every police officer’s mind constantly, if not always consciously, as he goes through his day at work.  Perhaps Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos were having just this type of discussion as they sat in their parked police car in Brooklyn Saturday afternoon.

What police officers do not often discuss — or at least they didn’t until Saturday — is what to do if someone sneaks up behind you and without warning shoots you in the head.

Dunphy concludes with an indictment of Mayor de Blasio:

The political theater of New York City, with a cast of characters found nowhere else, is often enjoyable to watch from the safe remove of the opposite coast, but with so much at stake it is painful to observe now.  Amid all the heated rhetoric and pointed fingers, New York’s police officers are expected to go out every day and place themselves between the law-abiding and the lawless.  Incredibly, they must do so without being altogether certain which of these sides their mayor is on.

It's not just de Blasio. It's Holder, Obama, Sharpton, and the host of race hustlers and professional protestors who may have convinced themselves that they are not anti-police and are only peaceful in their intent, but have to recognize that they have attracted a mob of people out for the blood of cops. Their overheated rhetoric has contributed to a climate that threatens chaos as policemen become the target of the rage stoked by everyone from the president on down.

Invariably, there's always some idiot politician or activist who thinks they can control the mob and ride their emotions to power and influence. It has never worked, and in this case, the mob's retribution has only served to show that the guilty have blood on their hands.

 

 

Jack Dunphy is a pseudonym used by a working LAPD police officer and has been writing for PJ Media for several years. His articles are always informative and give a worm's eye view of what it's like on America's mean streets for policemen who risk their lives every day to keep us safe.

His take on the execution of two cops in New York is emotional and instructive:

“What do we want?” came the shouted question from the marchers in New York City on Dec. 13.

“Dead cops!” came the reply.

“When do we want it?”

“Now!”

It took seven days, perhaps too long to satisfy the mob’s impatience, but now that they have two dead police officers, how many more will they want?

I have for years instructed young police officers placed in my charge that they cannot go about their duties thinking everyone they meet will try to kill them.  But, I warn them, nor can they forget that some people will.  With this unsettling fact in mind, police officers train for various scenarios in which they might find themselves endangered.  How will we respond if that liquor store on the corner is being robbed?  Can we see inside?  Is there a back door?  Is there a getaway car idling nearby?  Could there be a layoff man waiting unseen for the opportunity to ambush us?

Or take a scenario as simple as a traffic stop.  How many people are in the car?  What are they doing as we approach?  Are they tracking us in the mirrors?  Can we see their hands?  Where is our closest cover if one of them pulls a gun?  Will bystanders be endangered if we have to open fire?

The scenarios and the questions are endless, and they are on every police officer’s mind constantly, if not always consciously, as he goes through his day at work.  Perhaps Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos were having just this type of discussion as they sat in their parked police car in Brooklyn Saturday afternoon.

What police officers do not often discuss — or at least they didn’t until Saturday — is what to do if someone sneaks up behind you and without warning shoots you in the head.

Dunphy concludes with an indictment of Mayor de Blasio:

The political theater of New York City, with a cast of characters found nowhere else, is often enjoyable to watch from the safe remove of the opposite coast, but with so much at stake it is painful to observe now.  Amid all the heated rhetoric and pointed fingers, New York’s police officers are expected to go out every day and place themselves between the law-abiding and the lawless.  Incredibly, they must do so without being altogether certain which of these sides their mayor is on.

It's not just de Blasio. It's Holder, Obama, Sharpton, and the host of race hustlers and professional protestors who may have convinced themselves that they are not anti-police and are only peaceful in their intent, but have to recognize that they have attracted a mob of people out for the blood of cops. Their overheated rhetoric has contributed to a climate that threatens chaos as policemen become the target of the rage stoked by everyone from the president on down.

Invariably, there's always some idiot politician or activist who thinks they can control the mob and ride their emotions to power and influence. It has never worked, and in this case, the mob's retribution has only served to show that the guilty have blood on their hands.