Gruber on congressional hot seat today

Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber has a date with a congressional committee today, where he will apologize for calling the American people stupid and lying to the public about what was in the Affordable Care Act.

Sorry, Jonny...apology not accepted.

Fox News:

Jonathan Gruber's appearance before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee also marks one of Rep. Darrell Issa's last, high-profile shots at the health care law before he hands over his chairmanship next year. 

Issa, R-Calif. -- who has led the committee through controversial probes of the Benghazi attacks, the IRS scandal and more -- will lead the questioning of former health adviser Gruber on Tuesday. Gruber, an MIT economist, recently apologized for saying Americans' "stupidity" was vital to passing the health law in 2010.

Lawmakers also have obtained videos that show Gruber saying the act was written in a “very tortured way.” 

Issa told Reuters the public deserves an explanation from Gruber. "If you can't trust what he says, and what he says he'll do, to get votes and trick the American people into voting for something, then can you trust his analytics?" Issa said of Gruber. 

Like many congressional hearings, Tuesday's session may provide partisan fireworks without much movement toward changing the law. The president says he will veto any effort to overturn the Affordable Care Act, should such a bill reach his desk after Republicans add Senate control to their House majority next year.

Gruber has worked as a health care adviser in several states, including to former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. The federal government paid Gruber nearly $400,000 for his work.

Also testifying Tuesday will be Marilyn Tavenner, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In an effort to distance Tavenner from Gruber's remarks, the administration asked Issa to put her on a different witness panel. Issa's staff said it was weighing the request.

Issa should have scheduled Tavenner for a different day.  There are likely to be as much fireworks surrounding her appearance as Gruber's.  No dounbt, congressmen are going to want to know about the double-counting of dental plans, progress on the back-end of healthcare.gov, and the status of the hundreds of thousands of Obamacare enrollees whose eligibility for subsidies are in question.

But the center ring will feature Gruber, squirming like a fish out of water as lawmakers zero in on his statements.  The most entertaining part of the hearing may be watching Democrats as they try to defend him while at the same time trying to minimize his involvement.  That contortionist act will be worth the price of admission.

Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber has a date with a congressional committee today, where he will apologize for calling the American people stupid and lying to the public about what was in the Affordable Care Act.

Sorry, Jonny...apology not accepted.

Fox News:

Jonathan Gruber's appearance before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee also marks one of Rep. Darrell Issa's last, high-profile shots at the health care law before he hands over his chairmanship next year. 

Issa, R-Calif. -- who has led the committee through controversial probes of the Benghazi attacks, the IRS scandal and more -- will lead the questioning of former health adviser Gruber on Tuesday. Gruber, an MIT economist, recently apologized for saying Americans' "stupidity" was vital to passing the health law in 2010.

Lawmakers also have obtained videos that show Gruber saying the act was written in a “very tortured way.” 

Issa told Reuters the public deserves an explanation from Gruber. "If you can't trust what he says, and what he says he'll do, to get votes and trick the American people into voting for something, then can you trust his analytics?" Issa said of Gruber. 

Like many congressional hearings, Tuesday's session may provide partisan fireworks without much movement toward changing the law. The president says he will veto any effort to overturn the Affordable Care Act, should such a bill reach his desk after Republicans add Senate control to their House majority next year.

Gruber has worked as a health care adviser in several states, including to former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. The federal government paid Gruber nearly $400,000 for his work.

Also testifying Tuesday will be Marilyn Tavenner, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In an effort to distance Tavenner from Gruber's remarks, the administration asked Issa to put her on a different witness panel. Issa's staff said it was weighing the request.

Issa should have scheduled Tavenner for a different day.  There are likely to be as much fireworks surrounding her appearance as Gruber's.  No dounbt, congressmen are going to want to know about the double-counting of dental plans, progress on the back-end of healthcare.gov, and the status of the hundreds of thousands of Obamacare enrollees whose eligibility for subsidies are in question.

But the center ring will feature Gruber, squirming like a fish out of water as lawmakers zero in on his statements.  The most entertaining part of the hearing may be watching Democrats as they try to defend him while at the same time trying to minimize his involvement.  That contortionist act will be worth the price of admission.