Eric Garner protestors shut down Apple store because of capitalism or something

Protestors against the grand jury decision in the Eric Garner shooting are acting a little confused. Yesterday, they demonstrated outside an Apple, Inc. store and eventually made their way inside to stage a "die in." The action temporarily closed the store and the protestors seemed very pleased with thtemselves.

But when asked why they decided to shut down the store, one of them gave a rather perplexing answer:

Once inside, the protesters stood in circles and chanted while store employees and customers silently snapped photos.

Zandir Santos, 30, of Brooklyn, relished in the idea that protesters had disrupted life at an Apple store and a Macy's in New York. The filmmaker said this is a pivotal time in American history and that police must change how they treat people.

"The CEO of Apple knows we shut his store down--that means capitalist America is going to take us seriously," he said. "We are going to shake up your business and we want to hit you where it hurts. "

Chernell Brown lay down on the floor and encouraged other protesters to do the same in memory of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old black man who died after an altercation with a Ferguson, Mo., police officer in August. The move was symbolic of the four hours Brown lay on the ground after he died.

"This is our house," shouted Brown, 25. "No more business as usual. Revolution is not comfortable."

Dozens of protesters entered Macy's at about 7:50 p.m. and screamed "I can't breathe," as onlookers recorded them on their cell phones. Again, dozens staged a "die-in."

Jazz Shaw at Hot Air is as perplexed as the rest of us:

We’re seeing a repeating theme about sending a message to capitalist America. There was probably a time when that would have left me scratching my head since the local and city police aren’t generally seen as fat cats and robber barons. Then again, I’ve long since given up trying to suss out the rationale for some of these events. But seeing the assembly and tactics of the New York City crowd, combined with the messages on display here, I do have to wonder one thing. Are these just the dead enders from the Occupy movement finding a reason to dash back out into the streets and strike another blow against big business, this time using the death of Eric Garner and racial tension in general as a beard?

The left rarely cares what an actual protest is protesting against. Demonstrations against the Iraq War featured anti-povery advocates, self-proclaimed Communist revolutionaries. feminists rallying against the "patriarchy," and environmentalists against nuclear power. In this instance, I think Jazz is right. The Occupy Wall Street remnants are glomming on to the Eric Garner protests because there's lots of media in attendance and they miss all the attention.

Of course, this sort of nonsense dilutes the message of the Garner protestors. But in service to a higher cause - revolution! - they believe it's worth it.

Protestors against the grand jury decision in the Eric Garner shooting are acting a little confused. Yesterday, they demonstrated outside an Apple, Inc. store and eventually made their way inside to stage a "die in." The action temporarily closed the store and the protestors seemed very pleased with thtemselves.

But when asked why they decided to shut down the store, one of them gave a rather perplexing answer:

Once inside, the protesters stood in circles and chanted while store employees and customers silently snapped photos.

Zandir Santos, 30, of Brooklyn, relished in the idea that protesters had disrupted life at an Apple store and a Macy's in New York. The filmmaker said this is a pivotal time in American history and that police must change how they treat people.

"The CEO of Apple knows we shut his store down--that means capitalist America is going to take us seriously," he said. "We are going to shake up your business and we want to hit you where it hurts. "

Chernell Brown lay down on the floor and encouraged other protesters to do the same in memory of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old black man who died after an altercation with a Ferguson, Mo., police officer in August. The move was symbolic of the four hours Brown lay on the ground after he died.

"This is our house," shouted Brown, 25. "No more business as usual. Revolution is not comfortable."

Dozens of protesters entered Macy's at about 7:50 p.m. and screamed "I can't breathe," as onlookers recorded them on their cell phones. Again, dozens staged a "die-in."

Jazz Shaw at Hot Air is as perplexed as the rest of us:

We’re seeing a repeating theme about sending a message to capitalist America. There was probably a time when that would have left me scratching my head since the local and city police aren’t generally seen as fat cats and robber barons. Then again, I’ve long since given up trying to suss out the rationale for some of these events. But seeing the assembly and tactics of the New York City crowd, combined with the messages on display here, I do have to wonder one thing. Are these just the dead enders from the Occupy movement finding a reason to dash back out into the streets and strike another blow against big business, this time using the death of Eric Garner and racial tension in general as a beard?

The left rarely cares what an actual protest is protesting against. Demonstrations against the Iraq War featured anti-povery advocates, self-proclaimed Communist revolutionaries. feminists rallying against the "patriarchy," and environmentalists against nuclear power. In this instance, I think Jazz is right. The Occupy Wall Street remnants are glomming on to the Eric Garner protests because there's lots of media in attendance and they miss all the attention.

Of course, this sort of nonsense dilutes the message of the Garner protestors. But in service to a higher cause - revolution! - they believe it's worth it.