The People's Cube freed from Twitter Gulag

The People’s Cube is one of the funniest satirical websites, run by Oleg Atbashian, who honed his appreciation for the immorality of leftism by growing up in Soviet-era Ukraine and finding employment as an agitprop artist there, before defecting to the West.  In the interest of full disclosure, Oleg is a friend of mine.

Yesterday, however, Oleg ran into trouble with Twitter, the San Francisco-based outfit that failed to appreciate the irony that underlay a tweet he posted, giving the home address and telephone numbers of Julie Bosman, the New York Times writer who published the home address of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.  Twitter suspended the account of the People’s Cube.

Connoisseurs of irony should pause a moment here and note that Ms. Bosman, who thought nothing of making pubic Officer Wilson’s home address, a man who has gone into hiding for fear of his life, requested police protection for herself, and was laughed at by the Chicago cops.  The Illinois Review, via Gateway Pundit:

Julie Bosman, the Chicago-based New York Times reporter who published police officer Darren Wilson’s address is “over exaggerating” her security concerns say the Chicago Police Department (CPD).

Sources inside CPD tell Got News that Bosman (photo above) demanded a level of protection afforded A-List celebs and dignitaries. But an investigation revealed that she was not in any danger, and deserved no more than extra attention paid to her address by patrol.

Bosman “wasn’t under any real threat” says a Chicago police officer. “She came in thinking she was Steven Spielberg or something shooting a movie” demanding all kinds of protections says a law enforcement source with knowledge of the Chicago police. “The police laughed at her.”

Back to The People’s Cube.  A back-and forth ensued:

We replied in a civil manner, trying not to aggravate anyone with the power to prolong our suspension indefinitely:

Eventually, Twitter relented and restored the account, with a warning not to offend (presumably by publishing names and addresses) again.

As Oleg himself puts it, “Some comrades’ addresses are more equal than other comrades’ addresses.”

The People’s Cube is one of the funniest satirical websites, run by Oleg Atbashian, who honed his appreciation for the immorality of leftism by growing up in Soviet-era Ukraine and finding employment as an agitprop artist there, before defecting to the West.  In the interest of full disclosure, Oleg is a friend of mine.

Yesterday, however, Oleg ran into trouble with Twitter, the San Francisco-based outfit that failed to appreciate the irony that underlay a tweet he posted, giving the home address and telephone numbers of Julie Bosman, the New York Times writer who published the home address of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.  Twitter suspended the account of the People’s Cube.

Connoisseurs of irony should pause a moment here and note that Ms. Bosman, who thought nothing of making pubic Officer Wilson’s home address, a man who has gone into hiding for fear of his life, requested police protection for herself, and was laughed at by the Chicago cops.  The Illinois Review, via Gateway Pundit:

Julie Bosman, the Chicago-based New York Times reporter who published police officer Darren Wilson’s address is “over exaggerating” her security concerns say the Chicago Police Department (CPD).

Sources inside CPD tell Got News that Bosman (photo above) demanded a level of protection afforded A-List celebs and dignitaries. But an investigation revealed that she was not in any danger, and deserved no more than extra attention paid to her address by patrol.

Bosman “wasn’t under any real threat” says a Chicago police officer. “She came in thinking she was Steven Spielberg or something shooting a movie” demanding all kinds of protections says a law enforcement source with knowledge of the Chicago police. “The police laughed at her.”

Back to The People’s Cube.  A back-and forth ensued:

We replied in a civil manner, trying not to aggravate anyone with the power to prolong our suspension indefinitely:

Eventually, Twitter relented and restored the account, with a warning not to offend (presumably by publishing names and addresses) again.

As Oleg himself puts it, “Some comrades’ addresses are more equal than other comrades’ addresses.”