Earth crumbling beneath the feet of Hillary's presidential campaign

As Hillary Clinton continues to collect honoraria well into six figures for speeches and “conversations with…” public appearances, her presidential prospects are evaporating. The “inevitable” nominee is experiencing something like a bad acid trip flashback, as memories resurface of a fresh faced, first term senator once again attracting the support -- or carefully calibrated neutrality -- of people the Clinton Dynasty expected fealty from. Beneath the haughty exterior, the former secretary of state may be suspecting subconsciously that people don’t like her very much.

Two new slights to the former first lady’s entitlement to the Oval Office have recently appeared.

Jonathan Allen of Bloomberg writes:

One of the leading candidates to manage Hillary Clinton’s expected campaign for U.S. president in 2016 has withdrawn from the running.

“I’ve been a part of some great campaigns and worked for terrific people, but want to explore other ways I can be of service,” Guy Cecil said in an e-mailed statement.

Cecil, the political director of Clinton’s losing 2008 presidential race, was the executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee for the past two election cycles. Democrats gained two seats in the 2012 election but lost control of the Senate in last month’s midterms.

Translation: I ain’t getting on this sinking ship.

Then there is this, from the brightest bulb in the dimming Kennedy family chandelier. Joe Battenfeld of the Boston Herald writes:

Hillary Clinton could suffer a serious case of Kennedy deja vu if she makes another presidential run.

This time it’s U.S. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III who may help derail Clinton’s White House path by endorsing her potential 2016 opponent, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, much the same way the late U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy backed Barack Obama in 2008.

“Whatever (Warren) wants to do she’s going to excel at,” the 34-year-old Kennedy said in interview with Herald editors and reporters. “She has been adamant that she’s not running for president and I take her at her word for that. If things change, we’ll see.”

The fact that Kennedy doesn’t dismiss a Warren run is significant and comes after his Massachusetts colleague, U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano, revealed to Boston Herald Radio that he told Warren he’d back her if she ran for president.

Kennedy could be an ace in the hole for Warren, the freshman Democrat who has energized liberals around the country with her attacks on greedy banks, Wall Street and Washington’s cozy relationship with lobbyists. (snip)

Kennedy refused to tell the Herald who he’d side with in a Clinton-Warren matchup, but he offered profuse praise for the Massachusetts senator, saying she’s “given voice” to middle-class families and that’s why her message has “been resonating so much.”

With the Kennedys signaling alignment with Warren, and the Obamas’ subterranean war with the Clintons quietly burning away, Hillary’s roster of allies is thinning out. Allies like Cecil declaring themselves out of the game of support are a tell. Forward-looking Democrats already see Hillary in the rear view mirror. Elizabeth Warren declares she isn’t running, but coyly declines to state she will not run.

Stay tuned. Even a candidate as pathologically power-hungry as Hillary may conclude that the struggle is likely to be futile. Or maybe not. Either way will be amusing.

As Hillary Clinton continues to collect honoraria well into six figures for speeches and “conversations with…” public appearances, her presidential prospects are evaporating. The “inevitable” nominee is experiencing something like a bad acid trip flashback, as memories resurface of a fresh faced, first term senator once again attracting the support -- or carefully calibrated neutrality -- of people the Clinton Dynasty expected fealty from. Beneath the haughty exterior, the former secretary of state may be suspecting subconsciously that people don’t like her very much.

Two new slights to the former first lady’s entitlement to the Oval Office have recently appeared.

Jonathan Allen of Bloomberg writes:

One of the leading candidates to manage Hillary Clinton’s expected campaign for U.S. president in 2016 has withdrawn from the running.

“I’ve been a part of some great campaigns and worked for terrific people, but want to explore other ways I can be of service,” Guy Cecil said in an e-mailed statement.

Cecil, the political director of Clinton’s losing 2008 presidential race, was the executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee for the past two election cycles. Democrats gained two seats in the 2012 election but lost control of the Senate in last month’s midterms.

Translation: I ain’t getting on this sinking ship.

Then there is this, from the brightest bulb in the dimming Kennedy family chandelier. Joe Battenfeld of the Boston Herald writes:

Hillary Clinton could suffer a serious case of Kennedy deja vu if she makes another presidential run.

This time it’s U.S. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III who may help derail Clinton’s White House path by endorsing her potential 2016 opponent, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, much the same way the late U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy backed Barack Obama in 2008.

“Whatever (Warren) wants to do she’s going to excel at,” the 34-year-old Kennedy said in interview with Herald editors and reporters. “She has been adamant that she’s not running for president and I take her at her word for that. If things change, we’ll see.”

The fact that Kennedy doesn’t dismiss a Warren run is significant and comes after his Massachusetts colleague, U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano, revealed to Boston Herald Radio that he told Warren he’d back her if she ran for president.

Kennedy could be an ace in the hole for Warren, the freshman Democrat who has energized liberals around the country with her attacks on greedy banks, Wall Street and Washington’s cozy relationship with lobbyists. (snip)

Kennedy refused to tell the Herald who he’d side with in a Clinton-Warren matchup, but he offered profuse praise for the Massachusetts senator, saying she’s “given voice” to middle-class families and that’s why her message has “been resonating so much.”

With the Kennedys signaling alignment with Warren, and the Obamas’ subterranean war with the Clintons quietly burning away, Hillary’s roster of allies is thinning out. Allies like Cecil declaring themselves out of the game of support are a tell. Forward-looking Democrats already see Hillary in the rear view mirror. Elizabeth Warren declares she isn’t running, but coyly declines to state she will not run.

Stay tuned. Even a candidate as pathologically power-hungry as Hillary may conclude that the struggle is likely to be futile. Or maybe not. Either way will be amusing.